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CRUCIAL BLAST WEBSTORE: NEW ARRIVALS FOR MONDAY MARCH 9TH 2015

    Greetings, nightrunners...

    Welcome to the latest list of fringe metal abominations, anti-human art and outré listening experiences that comprise the Crucial Blast new arrivals for this week. And there is a lot for you to check out - over 130 new releases, restocks and hard-to-find out of print titles that I've assembled from across the globe. A bunch of noteworthy new albums from heavyweights like Leviathan, Old Man Gloom and even our own Gnaw Their Tongues are in here, lots of recent horror soundtrack reissues including a few that I've personally been looking forward to for quite some time, and some great stuff from favorite labels like Malignant, Annihilvs, and Cold Spring.

    The featured release is the latest from Boston-area outfit Sewer Goddess, whose latest Painlust has been repeatedly finding its way to the C-Blast office soundsystem over the past week. There were a bunch of amazing new metal albums that came out this week (Leviathan, Sumac, Sannhet) that all floored me in one form or another, but there's something about Painlust that made it the perfect soundtrack to the past few weeks for me here. It features a similar sound as the band's previous releases, but here it's pared down by band leader Kristin Rose to a leaner, more focused sonic attack, maintaining that filthy blackened industrial vibe but adding a heavier amount of Godfleshian heaviness than ever before. While there's definitely a major Godflesh (and Swans) influence, Rose and crew merge that pummeling industrial metal with a thick, cloying atmosphere of rust and rot that transforms this into their own distinct brand of hellish machinefucked heaviosity. For anyone who shares my taste in malevolent industrial metal, this one is highly recommended...


    Also on this week's update is the new Collected Atrocities 2005-2008 2xCD from Gnaw Their Tongues that came out recently from Crucial Blast. It's a collection of rare, out-of-print and unreleased material that was produced by this notorious Dutch black industrial band within the first few years of it's existence. Predating the Epiphanic album, these early works are just as depraved and disgustingly caustic as that album, delivering that unique monstrous hybrid of black metal, death industrial, doom, and noise that Gnaw Their Tongues has become renowned for over the past decade. Pick this up and see where the filth first started to flow; a perfect primer to lead up to their upcoming performances in the USA later this year. Along with the 2xCD and digital album, we also released a new shirt design that's available individually or bundled with the album.

    Lots of black metal of the left-field/progressive persuasion this week, including new releases and new vinyl editions of albums from Alraune, Mysticum, Xothist, Vorde, and Imperial Triumphant; Bethlehem's latest mutant gloomfest Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia, the crazily-packaged In Death 7" from noisy black metallers Ancestors, and the long-awaited new mini-album from the singular post-punk influenced black metal band Ghost Kommando, Abraxas Rising; brutal blackened punk barbarism from Damonenblut and a vinyl version of Hail Spirit Noir's blackprog debut Pneuma, recent split 7"s from Krieg / Ramlord and Vermapyre / Vehrmoedr, the trippy post-punk/black metal/hardcore lunacy of Leather Chalice's Luna, and the deformed sewer deliriums of De Silence Et D'Ombre's Vol. IV - Worship The Hideous.

   Fans of industrial heaviness will want to check out the new 2xLP reissue of the debut release from Author & Punisher, crushing new discs from Auditor and Khost, a massive triple-disc retrospective of Norwegian industrial metallers Red Harvest, restocks of the latest from pioneers Godflesh AND a killer new compilation called Fathers Of Our Flesh that features the likes of Gnaw, Nadja, Author & Punisher, Eagle Twin, Wormed and many more each doing their own unique interpretations of classic Godflesh tracks; and a new cassette version of Pig Heart Transplant's latest album For Mass Consumption...

    On the horror soundtrack front, C-Blast continues to expand it's selection with new and recent releases of the reissue of the score for Argento's Phenomena from Italian spook-prog masters Goblin, Simon Boswell's ornate score to the brutal Soavi slasher Stage Fright, the new One Way Static release of Phillip Glass's haunting Candyman score (on vinyl AND cassette), and reissues of John Cameron's wild and witchy Psychomania score and the Dawn Of The Dead Unreleased Music compilation, both from Trunk; as well as recent reissues of the John Carpenter scores for Prince Of Darkness and Halloween III: season Of The Witch, and most importantly, the new solo album from John Carpenter Lost Themes, a killer full-length of proggy, sinister synthesizer music from the master of cinematic tension and dread. There's also a new repress of Richard Band's Re-Animator OST, and a CD that features the entire soundtrack to the 1968 release of Haxan: Witchcraft Through The Ages, combining William S. Burrough's narrative with a cool experimental jazz score.

    A bunch of extreme electronics and noise releases from Bastard Noise (including their long-delayed collaboration with Kalmex And The Riffmerchants that is probably the weirdest fucking release on this list), Maurizio Bianchi's Amentest 7", the out-of-print Aube CD Howling Obsession [Revised], the punishing HNW of Edwige's Virgin Capricorn LP, a couple of twisted power electronics/industrial tapes on Tested Souls from X Narrative and Exploring Therapeutic Encounter, and a pair of brutal noise/cut-up 7"s from John Wiese, one of 'em a collab with former Fear Of God member Dave Phillips; nerve-shredding power electronics from Streetmeat, Baculum and False Flag, and a flesh-rending 7" of extreme synthesizer violence from Japan's Zaiden.

    Things get extremely ugly with recent vinyl editions of Coffinworm's latest and a new Lp from UK sludge/noise rock heathens Art Of Burning Water; a restock of Fistula's recent filth-feast Vermin Prolificus, and the debut album from pessimistic tarpit thugs Fortress, Unto The Nothing; we've got all of the recent releases from back-in-action noise rock legends Hammerhead, and those currently out-of-print 2xLP reissues of the classic early Melvins albums Eggnog / Lice All and Ozma / Bullhead - quantities are very limited. Restocks of Mournful Congregation's Concrescence Of The Sophia and the slo-mo sludge rock bliss of the Godstopper/Tendril split; newly remastered 2xLP reissues of Isis's Oceanic and Panopticon; more grueling noise rock via Rectal Hygienics' Ultimate Purity, and Moutheater's Passing Key. And more soul-flattening doom from Sea Witch, Pallbearer, Sea Of Bones, and Witch Mountain.

    And so much more, from the vinyl release of the blistering Wolves Of Heaven / Nyodene-D split, the latest double album of jazz-damaged Godfleshian heaviness from Combat Astronomy, and a new album from New York metallic hardcore band Darkside NYC that showcases their vicious mashup of streetwise punk, Celtic Frost-style riffage and extreme noise; to the industrial-tinged doom-jazz of Laube, and the hallucinatory French weirdness of Echancrure's Paysage, Octobre and reissues of French black metal narco-maniacs Diapsiquir; gobs of insane noisecore from Sissy Spacek and Surplus Killing; crazed death metal weirdness from Order From Chaos, Lithotome, and Dimentianon; violent hardcore and power-violence from Chest Pain, Column Of Heaven, Iron Lung, Man Is The Bastard, No Faith, Suppression, Nuklear Blast Suntan, and Una Bestia Incontrolable; mutant grindcore from the likes of Sete Star Sept, Plutocracy, Pryapisme, and the new Psudoku album Planetarisk Sudoku. Hard-to-find releases from death industrial and infernal ambient outfits Elhaz, Hadit and Valefor released on the defunct German label Memento Mori, and lots of great dark ambience and ritualistic resonances from Draugurinn, Solo Andata, Caulbearer and Sky Burial, Sigma Octantis, Emme Ya and Nuit, and Slavic synth primitavists Sorfeum. And plenty of pitch-black electronic / industrial sounds to sink into from Pharmakon, Theologian, Martin Bladh and Sektor 304, Murderous Vision, Sutekh Hexen, Trepaneringsritualen and others, as well as a new fanzine called Forever Doomed from Tenebrous Kate that further explores her interests in occult metal and vintage black magic cinema.

As always, we have a lot for you to check out, much more mutant extreme music and misanthropic art to be found on our shelves and in our bins...keep reading below to check out all of the strange and extreme new music, film, and art that's included in this week's new arrivals list.

Don't forget, you can click on the thumbnail image of the album cover for everything we carry in our shop to pull up a pop-up window showing an actual photograph of the item!



FEATURED RELEASE



SEWER GODDESS   Painlust   CD   (Malignant)    11.98



    Didn't really realize it until I sat down to note my impressions of the new Sewer Goddess album Painlust, but it's actually been a full five years since the Boston-area project gave us their last album, 2010's With Dirt You Are One . There's been a couple of smaller releases, EPs and tapes and the like that have surfaced in the interim, along with that killer Live Waste disc that Malignant put out a while back, but this new disc is the first full album of new material from the band in all this time. I loved the debut, and made it a featured new release here at C-Blast back when it came out; the way it fused its blackened power electronics to doom-metal guitars and squealing, skin-eating electronic noise managed to avoid sounding like just another Abruptum / Gnaw Their Tongues clone, and it was easily the heaviest thing that I'd ever heard come from the Malignant label up to that point. For the band's latest, though, mastermind Kristen Rose has re-shaped her band's sound into a more concentrated form: those grueling death industrial elements are still front and center, but Sewer Goddess's sophomore album strips away all of the extraneous flesh from their sound, mounting it on a ravenous industrial metal chassis that serves as a perfect delivery system for Rose's noxious, masochistic visions.
    And where earlier efforts were primarily the work of Rose alone, Sewer Goddess has also now evolved into an actual band, which includes Carl Haas from power electronics project Sharpwaist on bass; there's also a guest appearance from guitarist John Gelso of black metal legends Profanatica and The Royal Arch Blaspheme on the song "Get The Rope". With this expanded lineup, Painlust naturally offers a heavier, fuller sound than before, and that's never more apparent than the tracks in which they lurch into their crushing, pestilent version of industrial metal. The album slow cranks its flesh-chewing gears, spreading apart the sound to get at the black rot inside of each track; when it starts off with the droning industrial clamor of "Plague Axis", it's a drawn-out introduction to Painlust's horrors, initiating contact through a long sprawl of dirgelike synthesizer chords, clanking metallic percussion and distorted screams that all seem to be taking place somewhere in the distance. But when the next song "My Grave" kicks in, it's a punch to the ribs, the band suddenly shifting into a supremely sinister-sounding industrial metal dirge with Rose now adopting an almost gothy disaffected moan, the music turning into a a strange shambling mix of putrescent electronics and slow-motion heaviness, with glimmers of something sad and beautiful beneath the grinding, squelchy sludge; it's like some blacker, more metallic take on early Swans, filtered through a heavy haze of black metal-esque atmopsherics and draped in gloomier guitars. Fucking fantastic.
    It isn't complex music, usually centering around a single dramatic riff that churns relentless through the band's blackened din. But it's nevertheless powerful stuff, hypnotic in its grinding monotony, but also surprisingly catchy. The tracks proceed through an array of deformed soundscapes and torturous industrial heaviness, oozing through warped blackened ambience and punishing Streetcleaner-esque hypno-sludge, vocals drifting across the album in a reptilian hiss or mutating into unsettling, heavily processed demonic moans. Painlust has plenty of moments where it's as heavy as any doom metal, but the surrounding layers of vile distorted electronics and filthy synthesizer keep it rooted in a more industrial sound. The best stuff on here are tracks like "Black Meat And Bones" and closer "Melena's Mask", both evoking the squealing discordance and grinding post-punk guitars of early Godflesh and Head Of David, with some earworm riffage fused to that assault of thunderous oil-drum percussion, clanging noise loops and Rose's creepy vocals, carving out a killer blast of howling, blackened machine-rock. More than ever before, this manages to evoke qualities of both Gnaw Their Tongues/MZ.412 style black industrial, and the apocalyptic pummel of Godflesh; in some ways, this stuff is also reminiscent of labelmates Sektor 304 with the blend of grinding electronic filth and bleak metallic heaviness, and certainly elicits a similarly blackened atmosphere. Totally fitting that the grotesque album art was designed by Sektor 304's Andre Coelho.
Track Samples:
Sample : My Grave
Sample : Get the Rope
Sample : Black Meat and Bones


NEW ADDITIONS



ALRAUNE   The Process Of Self-Immolation   LP   (Gilead Media)    19.99



    Now available on limited-edition vinyl.
     The Process of Self-Immolation is the debut full-length from Nashville black metallers Alraune, a newer band made up of current and former members of Yautja and Mourner; it's the follow-up to their well-received tape that came out on Graceless Recordings not too long ago. Combining a rhythmically complex brand of blackened metal with Slinty math rock influences and intense, emotional delivery, these guys have whipped up one of the more impressive debuts to appear this year, with a confident approach towards fusing elegant icy melodies with a vicious Scandinavian-inspired attack.
     The brief intro track opens the album with the sounds of mournful, low-fi folk, the distorted buzz of the strings ringing out through a murky haze, before the band launches violently into the blazing black metal of "Exmordium". Alraune's sound immediately reveals the sort of soaring melodic sensibilities found in fellow American BM outfits like Krallice, Fell Voices and Ash Borer, that classic Nordic-influenced sound underscored by eerily pretty minor key melodies and cascades of spidery arpgeggiated notes that seem to draw from early 90's math rock just as much as they do from the frostbitten chordal forms of black metal. And as the album progresses, more of that mathiness emerges through the violent blastbeat-driven wintervisions, vicious buzzsaw riffs and rampaging d-beat tempos suddenly hurtling out of the chaos before slipping into some off-kilter, angular breakdown or wash of creepy dissonant instrumental guitar. There's a raw, low-fi edge to Process that really works in its favor, contrasting with the ambitious complexity of the songs and the Slinty digressions and eruptions into soaring, keening droning guitar leads that streak over the thunderous blasting epics like "Simulacra". The vocals have a strange distorted sheen than clings to them, at times sounding as if those desperate screams and shrieks are being transmitted out of a crackling transistor radio as the elegant, mournful tremolo riffs swarm madly around, slipping into some terrific little moments of phantasmic beauty, like how the end of "Kissed By The Red" goes from the aggressive, majestic metallic blast into the sound of Scottish folk singer Isla Cameron singing "O Willow Waly", taken from Jack Clayton's 1961 supernatural classic The Innocents. And at the end, Alraune drag their ragged frenzy down to an almost doom-laden pace on the closing title track, the song lumbering through an epic sprawl of slow pummeling tempos, blazing blastbeats and wretched screaming that leads towards the powerful combination of frantic blackened tremolo riffs and pounding tribal rhythms that take over the second half of the song.
     A promising start from this new entry in the USBM field, Process skillfully combines haunting melodic dissonance, raw savagery and a distinct progressive edge into a powerful and mournful sound of their own. Killer stuff. Comes in digipack packaging.
Track Samples:
Sample : The Process of Self-Immolation
Sample : Simulacra
Sample : Exordium



ART OF BURNING WATER   Living is For Giving, Dying Is For Getting   LP   (Riot Season)    23.00



Still one of Britain's most overlooked bands, Art Of Burning Water are back with their latest slab of downtuned berserker evil, the vinyl-only Living Is For Giving, and it's just one more blood-splattered chapter in the band's ongoing cataloguing of humanity's eternal wretchedness. Their stuff also continues to fall oustide of any clearly delineated genre as well. Grindcore, demented thrash metal, downtuned doom, vomit-spattered punk, howling noise rock - all of that stuff is fed into the band's gnashing chaos, and comes out fused to a rabid, terrifying sonic assault that tears violently through these ten invectives. The label states that the band would be appreciated by fans of "Keelhaul, Rorschach, Voivod, Amebix, Godflesh and Motorhead", but that's not a comparison to the band's sound, but rather a suggestion of the sheer energy, abrasiveness and aggression that emanates from the music on this LP.
Despite the somewhat tongue-in-cheek song titles and their pitch-black sense of humor, this is incredibly vicious stuff, filthy, fractured metallic hardcore with viciously inverted riffs and an intense, bloodlusting vocal attack, which on songs like "Happiness Always Ends In Tears" kind of comes across as Converge's blackened, rabid little brother, with a similar ability to mix noise rock, metal and the most feral punk into a relentlessly aggressive whole, while the song "At The Hands Of Them" kicked this into higher gear and tore my goddamn face off with its brain-damaged, PCP-soaked take on Voivodian thrash. All of these songs on Living are fucking savage stuff, and much more powerful than any of these reference points can convey. Art Of Burning Water are use carefully selected and edited samples that they interlace with ghostly loops of industrial noise, brief noisescapes that are threaded around each belligerent blast of discordant, feral thrash to help build the misanthropic atmopshere that hangs over all of this stuff. Eruptions of slower, even heavier riffage juts violently out of that rampaging hardcore, the songs veering into a thresher of intricate churning breakdowns and murderous corkscrew grooves that turn an already violent sound into something even more brash and unbalanced; you definitely get the feeling that the guys behind this ultra-heavy ugliness have some genuinely anti-social tendencies. This album is just as ferocious as anything they've given us before, and is one of the nastiest sounding albums of its kind to come in here lately; it's criminal that these guys are better known in metal/hardcore circles - if they were on Deathwish instead of an avant-rock label like Riot Season, people would be losing their goddamn minds over this stuff. Well worth picking up if you're into the more insolent and off-beat violence found with the likes of Starkweather, Hard To Swallow and Kickback...


BAND, RICHARD   H.P. Lovecraft's Re-Animator (2014 Edition)   LP   (Waxwork)    26.00



    Finally have this cult classic score in stock, recently repressed by the folks at Waxwork after initially going out of print. The label's vinyl reissue of Richard Band's Re-animator score was one of the very first releases for the label, and naturally got them quite a bit of attention from horror circles; you'd have a tough time trying to find a film more emblematic of the excesses of 1980s horror, and Re-animator remains one of the most beloved movies from the era. Directed by the brilliant Stuart Gordon, this 1985 film was the first in a series of gory, gloopy adaptations of H.P. Lovecraft stories from the director, updating the weird tale of the original serial with massive doses of 80's gore and mayhem. Not to mention a big helping of pitch-black humor, too; alongside Evil Dead II and Return Of The Living Dead, this is a stone cold horror-comedy classic, capable of eliciting belly laughs one moment, and sheer revulsion in the next, such as the oh-so-infamous sequence of cadaverous cunnilingus in the film's climax that still packs one hell of a revolting punch.
    And Richard Band's score for Re-animator is pretty iconic on its own. Instead of going for a synth-driven sound like many of his contemporaries, Band used the Rome Philharmonic Orchestra to perform his quirky score for the film, a score that directly referenced Bernard Herrmann's classic Psycho theme and extrapolated upon it for Re-animator's own theme. He actually caught a bit of heat over his "borrowing" of certain aspects of Herrmann's score, something that is discussed in the liner notes to Waxwork's reissue; listening to the two pieces of music back to back does point out some definite differences, with Band working the strings around wonky dissonant violins and a pounding disco-like backbeat. But from there Band crafts his own distinct mix of eerie orchestral sounds, strings that slowly weave an atmosphere of morbid whimsicality and building dread, somnambulant electronic drones and blasts of growling synthesizer that weaving in and out of the mix, drifting amid the low groan of cellos and the often thunderous percussion, while that main title theme recurs throughout Band's score, with the occasional shot of almost Carl Stalling/Danny Elfman-esque absurdism briefly appearing amid the darker, more disturbing sequences, perfectly evoking the film's balance of humor and horror.
    He'd go on to produce a large body of music after this, but Re-animator still stands as one of Band's best scores, something that was more in the spirit of his beloved Herrmann and composers like James Horner and Jerry Goldsmith than the electronic scores that 80's horror is usually associated with. And this vinyl reissue is the best presentation this music has ever had, re-mastered from the original tapes and pressed on gorgeous green and white 180 gram vinyl, packaged in a killer-looking jacket designed by Gary Pullin, with a printed inner sleeve that features liner notes from Band and director Gordon that shed light on the Herrmann comparisons and the creation of the score, as well as some neat, rarely-seen photos of the recording session.


CARPENTER, JOHN   Lost Themes   CD   (Sacred Bones)    13.98



    There's been feverish anticipation building around the C-Blast office for months, waiting for Lost Themes. The first ever "solo" album from John Carpenter outside of his legendary film score output (and his one-off band The Coupe De Villes with Tommy Lee Wallace and Nick Castle), Lost Themes comes at the height of a recent resurgence of interest in 80's era synthesizer music and classic horror movie scores, and John Carpenter's synth-drenched soundtracks in particular. A number of amazing reissues have surfaced lately from the likes of Mondo and Death Waltz, high-quality vinyl reissues of Carpenter's iconic music for classic films like Escape From New York, Halloween, Prince Of Darkness and The Fog, which have allowed a whole new audience to discover anew what many of us that have been worshipping at the altar of Carpenter since the VHS boom have known all along: this guys is one of the preeminent film and music stylists of the late 20th century. He's more revered now than ever, now that his stately nightmare visuals and pioneering electronic scores have so heavily influenced various aspects of our culture since he first appeared in the 1970s.
    So when word came out that Carpenter would be releasing his first ever collection of non-filmic music, I could hardly wait. While his more recent film work hasn't made much of an impression on me, I had a lot of faith in this project, especially after hearing some of the tracks that came out in advance of the album's release. And when it finally landed in my hands and slipped onto the turntable, I couldn't have been more stoked on how good this album turned out to be. It's not the minimal synthesizer music of his early works like some might have expected, but rather a dark and bombastic sound, well produced and heavy on the guitars. Lost Themes was created with his son Cody (who produces his own brand of progressive rock with the band Ludrium ) and godson Daniel Davies (of stoner rockers Year Long Disaster), but from the opening notes this is immediately recognizable as a John Carpenter recording. Once that moody piano figure enters at the beginning of "Vortex" and the music gives way to those familiar synth arpeggios, there's no question as to who you're listening to. It's lush stuff, with lots of distorted guitar chords and pulsating beats that are definitely reminiscent of the rock-tinged sound of his later 80s work for films like Prince Of Darkness, Big Trouble In Little China and They Live. Still dark and menacing, though, with that signature ability to create a mood of tension that slowly and inexorably builds across the piece of music. These nine songs teem with tension, and the more expansive nature of a full album allows his pulsating electronics and pounding rhythms to develop more extensively than they might on a film score. Every track is a carefully crafted exercise in mood and menace, from the eerie piano melody that cascades across the propulsive gothic prog of "Obsidian", as sinister organs twine around fuzz-burnt guitar, a track that has some surprising echoes of Italian prog rockers Goblin, to the heavy metal guitars that thunder across "Fallen", and the pulsating rhythms transform "Domain" into a killer piece of futuristic dance floor malevolence, complete with one of the most pulse-pounding motorik grooves I've heard in ages. There's actually quite a bit on Lost Themes that reminds me of Goblin, but Carpenter and crew incorporate a larger palette of sounds, from orchestral strings that spread like shadows beneath the propulsive tempos, to gleaming electronic glitchery that gives this a much sleeker, blacker sound.
    It's hard to not to get caught up in a heavy feeling of nostalgia when you're listening to this, but I was genuinely surprised how little Lost Themes sounded like any specific classic Carpenter score; if you listen to a lot of film music, you'll begin to notice that a lot of composers tend to recycle certain themes and ideas. But Carpenter largely avoids that with this new music, and any concerns that the album was going to be made up of cast-off material from older scores disappear pretty quickly once his pounding synth-driven darkness sweeps over you. The album deftly balances vintage tones with modern technique and texture, and most importantly, all of this stuff flows together superbly. Can't imagine anyone else surpassing this as the dark synth album of the year, a stunning, wholly cohesive album from the master; anyone into the likes of Carpenterian disciples like Zombi, Umberto, Antoni Maiovvi, Majeure and the like should make their way to this album pronto. Comes in a striking gatefold sleeve bearing Carpenter's visage cloaked in darkness, and includes a printed insert with liner notes by soundtrack scholar Daniel Schweiger; the vinyl version also comes with a digital download.
Track Samples:
Sample : Night
Sample : Abyss
Sample : Mystery
Sample : Obsidian



CAULBEARER + SKY BURIAL   Canticle Of The Three   CDR   (Peacock Window)    9.98



   Canticle is a new collaboration between two Crucial Blast alumni, Caulbearer and Sky Burial, teaming up to produce a killer album of doom-laden kosmische electronics, and man is it dark. Dark and impressively grim, this disc unleashes three sprawling, stygian epics of crushing drone-noise and apocalyptic atmosphere, and fans of Mike Page's more sinister work with Sky Burial are going to love the desolate driftscapes that these guys have crafted here. The album moves through swirling miasmal fogbanks of chittering electronics and roaring orchestral drone that stretch across vast yawning chasms of pure blackness, sprawls of nightmarish kosmische dread that rise and fall in waves over fields of grinding, distorted rumble; if indie horror directors had any fucking sense, this is where they would be turning for film-scores.
    The first track "Vortices" unfolds into a kind of jet-black cosmic electronics, the sound utterly vast and oppressive like heavy black clouds of negative energy hanging over a blasted landscape, shot through with bits of eerie choral drift and rhythmic crackle and ominous symphonic swells. Huge grinding tremors reverberate through the track, like cyclopean temple doors opening in the bowels of the earth, while ghostly howls streak high over a distant blood-rimmed horizon. As the album continues to unfurl, elliptic keyboards glimmer in an endless heat haze, only to slowly build and transform into a surprisingly heavy wall of cosmic doom-drift that rises over the latter half of the track; throughout Canticle, this swirling, massive, amorphous driftscape shifts and billows in formless waves of sound, sweeping slowly through fields of endless darkness, the sound traced with jittering mechanical noises and immense orchestral drones, bursts of choral dread that wash through the abyss.
    All of this flows together, a roiling black ambience strafed with high keening feedback that screams out of the distant depths, a vast oceanic roar of metallic shimmer and drift, cold and unwelcoming and inhospitable, formed from layers upon layers of dissonant sound and searing sustained drones and symphonic roar that the two musicians sculpt into a nightmarish wall of sound, culminating with the bleak bathysphere ambience and nocturnal droneology of the closing track "Miserere Nobis". In those last moments, strains of murky gothic organ glimmer beneath the roiling black fog of static and hiss, while EVP-like exhalations swoop through the depths amid the groan of tortured metal and faint, black pulses of low-voltage energy, the album slowly breaking apart and dissolving into the void. Fantastic stuff that's highly recommended if you're into the Malignant / Annihilvs brand of grim industrial ambience and kosmische blackness. Comes in a four-panel digipack, limited to just one hundred copies.
Track Samples:
Sample : Vortices
Sample : Scorched Hymnal
Sample : Miserere Nobis



COLUMN OF HEAVEN   Ecstatically Embracing All That We Habitually Suppress   LP   (Regurgitated Semen)    17.99



    Recorded directly in the wake of Toronto band The Endless Blockade's dissolution in 2011, Ecstatically Embracing All That We Habitually Suppress was the first demo from Column Of Heaven, the new band formed by Blockade members Andrew Nolan and Eric King. Originally released through their own Survivalist imprint, this lethal demo was subsequently reissued by German grindcore label Regurgitated Semen as a limited-edition one-sided 12", and it smashes straight through your skull with six tracks of the band's brutal, noise-damaged occult blastcore.
    From the bizarre, disorienting intro track "Altars" that combines what sounds like female voices rising in liturgical chant with a power electronics-style vocal assault and a wall of churning, abrasive heaviness, to the five songs of gnarled, barbaric blastcore that follow, this short EP delivers another highly potent dose of Column Of Heaven's unique strain of hateful heaviness, blending together elements of violent death/grind, misanthropic power electronics and industrial noise into a flesh-blistering, bass-heavy powerviolence attack a la Infest and Man Is The Bastard. Many bands fail to capture the "violence" in that last part of the equation, but as with everything else I've heard from these guys, Column's music sounds genuinely threatening. The tracks careen through roughly ten minutes of jagged hyper-speed hardcore that skids to abrupt stops, blasting walls of guttural grind, pounding war-drums thundering beneath gales of horrific electronic chaos, with some of the angriest yet most thought-provoking lyrics you'll find in the extreme hardcore/grind underground. The closing track "The Future Of War" is a powerful finale to this brief blast of nihilistic power, eschewing the blasting violence of the previous tracks for a garbled noisescape that combines fragments of a speech from author Howard Bloom with putrid drones and bursts of terrifying electronics. Just as some of the members did in their previous band Endless Blockade, Column Of Heaven reconstruct extreme hardcore into something vicious and provocative. Limited to five hundred copies.
Track Samples:
Sample : The Future of War
Sample : Knowledge. Culture. Power.
Sample : Binge// Purge



COLUMN OF HEAVEN   Precipice   CASSETTE   (Survivalist)    7.98



   Be warned - this tape has been sold out from Survivalist for quite some time, and we only have a couple of copies left from the batch we picked up from them when the band came through D.C. earlier last year, so it's going to sell out very quickly. It's a fucking killer tape from the Toronto-based band, though, made up of various recorded material, some of which is apparently exclusive to this release. A quick, ugly blast of noise-mutated blastcore from this gang of misanthropes, which continues to showcase an even more savage and skull-crushing sound than what some of these guys did in their previous powerviolence outfit The Endless Blockade.
    The first side of Precipice features seven songs that are going to eventually make their way onto vinyl via a split LP with psychedelic powerviolence / sludge weirdos Suffering Luna that's hopefully going to materialize in the near future. It's some of the best stuff yet from Column Of Heaven, further sharpening their ultra-violent sonic attack that draws from classic powerviolence and blackened death metal influences, while heavily layering their negativity in eruptions of discordant sludge, eerie samples, hallucinatory loopscapes, black veins of throbbing death industrial, and gleaming electronic drone. All of that emerges throughout these songs, with blazing black metal riffs tearing through the ferocious thrash, and bursts of abrasive synth and noxious effects ripping out of chaotic speed-fueled hardcore. The songs slam into the listener one after another, leaving you no time to collect yourself before the next hyper-speed assault kicks in. This stuff is a physical assault, and I can't wait to hear it when it finally ends up on vinyl.
    The flipside features a handful of tracks that seem to be exclusive to this tape, including a crushing cover of "Eternal Woman (Hell Of Your Love)" by demented Finnish black metallers Ride For Revenge that is pretty pulverizing. That's followed by a pair of tracks from their noise / industrial alter-ego Wolves of Heaven, "Love Is A God From Hell" and "Hell Is A Love From God", the former mixing propulsive drumming with slowly building walls of crushing distorted noise and blown-out death metal guitar roar, with monstrous vocalizations woven into delirious looping ambience, amid waves of churning, chest-rattling low-end noise; while the latter is a swirling, strangely mesmeric mass of glitchy dissonant noise, a hauntingly minimal piano melody drifting over rumbling orchestral murmurs that emanate a cold, wintry majesty across the end of the cassette.


DARVULIA   Belladone   CD   (Battlesk'rs)    10.98



    Now have this vicious three-song EP from French black metal maniacs Darvulia in stock, in a six-panel gatefold digisleeve, each hand-numbered and limited to four hundred ninety-nine copies...
   One of the groups affiliated with the obscure Les Apôtres De l'Ignominie circle of black metal/black doom bands, Darvulia are another strange French black metal outfit that I've been into for awhile, with several murky, psychedelic albums on the Battleskrs label. The Belladone tape is a newer release, actually a re-issue of a 7" that came out back in 2003 that's pretty short but completely ripping. With a deliberately muddy recording that suggests that the members of Darvulia recorded these songs underneath a sewer grate somewhere in Toulouse. The three songs featured on this Ep are more of the murky, deformed black metal that this band is known for, with twisted, angular riffs that are pretty reminiscent of Deathspell Omega, but they also incorporate other sounds that make this more peculiar like weirdly placed bits of low-fi graveyard ambience and odd rhythmic parts. The first track is a downright bizarre piece for just vocals and guitar that lets loose with some warped LLN-esque ambience, but then the second song "Sorcieres" comes in with a rush of blazing low-fi hate, killer malevolent riffs swarming around the choked, snarling vocals of frontman Kobal (also a member of Sektarism and Malhkebre) and the shambling drumming. This is much rawer than a lot of the French BM that I've been listening to, with an ugly sickly feel with slower lurching riffage that sort of resembles some kind of wretched blackened noise-rock. Lastly, the third track is a faster, speedy blast of dissonance and murky riffing that slips into a killer rocking riff later on, with a level of punk urgency to this one that finished the Ep in a ferocious snarling blast of fuzz.
Track Samples:
Sample : ÿþVespérale Mélancolie
Sample : ÿþSorcières
Sample : Belladone



DIAPSIQUIR   Virus S.T.N.   CD   (Necrocosm)    11.98



   The 2005 album from one of France's most depraved black metal outfits is finally back in print! Here's my old write-up of the album from when we first got it in stock back then:
   Took multiple spins of Virus S.T.N. to even begin to get a grasp of what is going on with France's Diapsiquir. The sophomore album from these eclectic black metal surrealists is so intricately assembled and disorientating, it is impossible to absorb everything that is going on here in just one sitting. Just looking at the design of this thing, it's hard to guess what this will sound like: collages of photographs capturing blips of urban contamination surround the Diapsiquir logo, an awesome, heavily stylized riff on the "goat of Mendes" image, with the outer ring of the logo inscribed in the words "Seringue Absorption Torture Alienation Nihilisme", which obviously forms the acronym SATAN. All evil and misanthropic enough, but as soon as the eerie beats and classical sampling of opening track "Incubation" kicks this off, it's pretty clear that this is going to be anything but traditional black metal.
    Distant, ambient synths and sampled string sections play a recognizable classical melody over dubby, staticky trip-hop beats and abrasive industrial samples, the beats constantly shifting as far-off black metal riffs and distant sounds of screaming children appear alongside deep, raspy, half-spoken vocals. It's more like apocalyptic, avant-garde trip-hop than anything resembling black metal. But then "Venin Intemporel, Rouille Universelle, Satan" kicks in with that weirdly atonal black metal riff and what sounds like a mix of both blasting drum programming and actual live drumming, and this erupts into total violence; multiple vocalists screech and howl and rant over the percussive thrash before the song turns into a trippy dirge, glitchy electronic noise suddenly sweeping over another eerie, discordant riff and time-delayed vocals, before transforming into a surreal mash-up of Voivod style riffs, crushing breakbeats, damaged French folk music, squawking shrieks trading off with electronically processed vocals and a sort of broken cadence that sounds like some kind of demented, mutant French hip hop.
    It's a bizarre mash-up of influences and sounds that these guys put together, but Diapsiquir somehow manage to make their maniacal cacophony extremely evil sounding, imbued with a gleeful misanthropy that seeps from their whacked-out song structures and forays into fucked-up, anti-human hip-hop. Definitely not what you'd probably expect from a duo that includes one of the guys from blasphemous French black metallers Arkhon Infaustus. But there's certainly a strong current of black metal that runs through this album, an industrialized vision of black metal that prowls the same grim, post-Armageddon urban wastelands as those inhabited by Aborym, Mysticum and Dödheimsgard, but so much more fucked-up and drug-addled. Each song a blackened fever dream of pounding techno beats and grinding Industrial rhythms, powerful and dissonant black/thrash riffs, spurts of avant-garde jazz, appropriated themes from both The Godfather and Scarface film scores tossed into vats of hallucinatory electronics, songs frequently taking a ninety-degree stylistic turn right in the middle of the track. Even the production style of Virus S.T.N. is twisted, using weird mixing decisions and post-production fuckery that makes parts of this sound like some avant-garde hip-hop record. Utterly confounding, flamboyantly weird industrial/electro/black metal strangeness; these guys go pretty far beyond the experimentations of even the likes of Manes and Dødheimsgard. Highly recommended to adventurers in the field of psychedelic, dystopian black metal.
Track Samples:
Sample : Venin Intemporel Rouille Universelle Satan
Sample : Organisation Contamination
Sample : Diapsiquir



HADIT   Arise   CD   (Memento Mori)    11.98



   Some more obscure early-oughts occult ambience that I recently rediscovered via the Memento Mori catalog. Hadit's 2003 album Arise was the only release to come from this offshoot of German dark ambient outfit Mondblut, who had previously put out a couple of acclaimed released on Ant-Zen. With Hadit, the members sought to explore the more ritualistic aspects of Mondblut's sound in greater depth, crafting an album of effectively eerie ambience and kosmische dread that seems to combine elements of Euro horror soundtrack music, occult post-industrial, and orchestral ambience. Compared to the earlier Mondblut material, this new project also featured a heavier use of programmed rhythms and electronic beats, as well as employing the occasional abrasive vocal, in the form of black metal-esque croaks that surface intermittently throughout Arise's mesmeric nocturnal driftscapes.
    Like some of the other stuff that came out on Memento Mori, I can also hear a subtle darkwave influence on Hadit's music that makes this a little more musical than many dark ambient projects from around the same period. That shows up here in the form of ethereal female vocals and gloomy keyboard melodies that rise out of the droning darkness, at times reminding me of some of the more malevolent-sounding artists on Projekt. There's a dark liturgical vibe that hovers over the album, tracks opening with choral hymns and church organs reverberating through the corridors of vast ancient cathedrals. Disembodied wailing voices drift vaporously through deep underground vaults, ghostly voices echoing against the damp crypt walls alongside mysterious rattling sounds and more of those sinister Carpenterian synthesizer drones. There's quite a bit of that eerie synth music on this disc, which gives this some of that obscure 80s-era European horror score feel, but then you'll hear bizarre gasping vocalizations and weird chanting begin to drift out of the depths like the hungry murmurs of some desiccated abomination, and it begins to get a bit more surreal. Tympani drums pound in the distance while kosmische electronics coalesce in a nocturnal fog, and a vague Goblin-esque vibe can even be detected on tracks like "Das Tor Des Schweigenz - Gateway Of Solitude", traces of menacing progginess shifting in the depths of Hadit's sound. There's an eighteen minute epic called "Des Engels Tränen - Black Angels Tears" that sits at the center of the album, blending majestic soundtracky twilight vistas with more of those abject mewling voices, ghastly chants and swarming drones for what might be the most unsettling track on the whole disc. It's another one of my favorite dark ambient releases from the label, reeking of a dank, black cinematic atmosphere that fans of Raison d'être, Desiderii Marginis and like-minded Cold Meat artists will probably enjoy.
Track Samples:
Sample : Weltenreich - Realm Of The Worlds
Sample : Sh T-N
Sample : ÿþDes Engels Trànen - Black Angels & Tears



K.S.K.N.P. (KERRSTILLINGSKOZLETSKYNYSTROMPETRUS)   Death Instruktions   LP   (Malignant)    18.98



    Delivering exactly the sort of high-grade industrial deathdrive you'd expect from a group made up of some of the most formidable names in contemporary death industrial (Steel Hook Prostheses' John Stillings and Larry Kerr, Peter Nystrom of Megaptera/Negru Voda, Robert C. Kozletsky of Shock Frontier, and Stephen Petrus of Murderous Vision), K.S.K.N.P. debuts with the seven-song monstrosity Death Instruktions, a collective descent into the more nightmarish depths of mechanized soundscapery that's at least as grim and grisly as any of their respective projects.
    Starting with the rumbling dissonance and crushing metallic reverberations of "Scorched Skeletal Remains", the group proceed to forge an exceedingly bleak vision of hideously charred topography and concrete-covered killing fields, unleashing clusters of discordant notes hovering in nebulous forms over an excruciating onslaught of fractured glacial rhythms and eerie vocalizations. Fans of any one of these groups will be able to pick out signature traits of each, but this really works as a cohesive performance with the various elements blending together, slowly unfolding into a blackened rotting environment that sprawls across fields of mesmeric tribal rhythms and vile, processed vocals, insectoid electronics swarming in black masses over cold, desolate drones, utterly malevolent synthesizers sweeping like polluted, toxic clouds over each of these morbid driftscapes. Sinister chanting floats over sheets of seething bacterial activity, while coldly chiming tones linger at the edges of the recording. Distorted, demonic howls puncture the crackling factory-floor atmosphere, and those tribal drums slip in and out of earshot, disappearing for long stretches as desolate ambient drift takes over, before thundering back in on tracks like "The Executioner" in a wall of rumbling, wall-rattling power, surrounded by those sickening, distortion-saturated screams and ghostly wisps of minimal melodic synth. Distant, ritualistic gongs and ominous ghost-knocks echo over washes of vast choral sound and orchestral murmurs, giving way to murderous samples awash in buzzing, crystalline electronics. This is really primo stuff, jet-black, one of the finest evocations of an apocalyptic hell that Malignant has birthed in the past year. Oppressively bleak listening, but with traces of haunting musicality fleeting amid the corroded, corrupted ambience. A great debut from the project, issued in a limited run of two hundred fifty hand-numbered copies.


LEVIATHAN   Scar Sighted   CD DIGI-BOX   (Profound Lore)    13.99



    This American black metal innovator is back with has become a much-heralded new album (his fifth), and it's the best stuff that sole member Jef Whitehead (working under the pseudonym Wrest) has produced under the Leviathan name in years. It's also one of the best black metal albums to emerge thus far in 2015, a mature new vision of the sort of misanthropic, idiosyncratic black metal that Whitehead has been creating since the late 1990s, and longtime fans of the band's work will find some interesting new wrinkles in Leviathan's sound on Scar Sighted.
    That often discordant, unsettling blackened violence remains at the core of Leviathan's sound, but it's channeled through a more tangled, hallucinatory atmosphere that melds that black metal attack with soaring post-rock and experimental soundscapes, churning doom and bleak industrial , spun out into arresting and elaborately layered constructs. It's certainly a more sophisticated and focused album than Leviathan's provocative True Traitor True Whore, but rest assured that this sounds as savage as ever. An untitled intro casts waves of mournful orchestral drift across an expanse of murmuring voices and minimalist metallic clank, crafting a gorgeously moody atmosphere over the opening of Scar Sighted before Whitehead fully unleashes his blackened violence with "The Smoke Of Their Torment". And it's fearsome when that finally kicks in, his signature mix of sludgy riffage and bleary dissonance dragging through a swarming black fog of complex black metal delivered at maximum aggression. Dissonant guitar figures caper over the surging rhythmic complexity, his drumming shifting continuously between boiling double bass, tricky time signatures and blasts of straightforward thrash. That song is a fantastic piece of imaginative black metal, bleary and chaotic, but only hinting at the strange excursions that this album takes as it continues.
    Its caustic stuff, with varied and expressive vocals that slip from delirious chanting to blood-gargling screams to demented crooning stretched out across the bizarrely arranged riffs and stretches of muted monochromatic atmosphere. The continues to seethe and snarl from beneath an onslaught of powerful, memorable black metal riffs and an almost proggy complexity to the songwriting, moving from the strange fusion of classic, ice-encrusted Nordic fury and folk-flecked madness of "Dawn Vibration", to the dark industrial-tinged march of "Gardens Of Coprolite" that eventually blossoms into a stunning combination of maniacal black blast and churning math rock-style guitars; other songs feature some massively heavy doom-laden parts glazed with soaring, sun-blinded melodies, and there's more of that odd folkiness that pops up on the likes of "Wicked Fields Of Calm", almost like part of an old English madrigal taking shape out of the swarming blackened guitars. One of the album's most vicious songs is "Within Thrall", which starts off with some of that plaintive chanting and dissonant chords, but ends up winding through a labyrinth of searing blastbeats and violent blackened punk riffs. As on previous albums, Whitehead artfully employs industrial-style noise and surreal soundscapes throughout the album, brief but unsettling pieces of abstract sound woven directly into the songs, and there are moments where processed guitar blares across the music like a horn section, like some majestic fanfare sounding from the depths. The title track is another particularly impressive track, an anguished, almost funereal dirge that spirals downward, surrounded with distant, miserable shrieks and an affecting, mournful sadness that produces one of the album's most poignant compositions, eventually finding its way into an almost Godspeed-esque coda. And there are elements of classic 'gazey guitar and martial rhythms, liturgical chants and hypnotic electronic pulses, shades of industrial and neo-folk sounds that all further color Scar Sighted's desolate terrain, integrated into the lurching blackened heaviness and baleful blasts in a commanding and deeply personal manner.
    A wickedly impressive album that is exhausting and enthralling in equal measure, and an accomplished and adventurous direction for Leviathan's music. Gorgeous packaging for this disc as well, housed in an embossed white CD box along with a set of eleven double-sided art prints / inserts.
Track Samples:
Sample : Within Thrall
Sample : The Smoke of Their Torment
Sample : All Tongues Toward



LYNCH, DAVID + ALAN R. SPLET   Eraserhead OST (Jewel Case)   CD   (Absurda)    14.99



Here's the out-of-print 2003 Absurda release of Eraserhead, one of the most famous of all of the "midnight movies" that emerged in the 1970s, and still one of the most singular and profoundly unsettling films ever made. That's no hyperbole, as this first film from director David Lynch delivered a monochrome nightmare that has had an immense influence on late twentieth century culture. A fever dream of sexual loathing, parental fears and isolation, Eraserhead has withstood analysis and attempts at decoding its disturbing imagery and hallucinatory narrative in the decades since its release. And the soundtrack that Lynch constructed with sound designer Alan Splet is an integral part of the films haunting atmopshere, using musique concrete techniques, mechanical drones and looped noise to create a nightmarish proto-industrial soundscape that still chills, even when heard outside of the film.
The main score is made up of two roughly twenty-minute "sides": the first is pure dark droneological bliss, slowly drifting in with a distant, murky roar, a swirling black fog of distorted, muted rumble that billows out from some unseen void; as it slowly builds in volume and intensity, a vast Lustmordian mass of sound that proceeds to unfold through chambers of black sound. The recording moves through passages of distant rhythmic clanking, and mysterious field recordings; hazily fragments of orchestral music are glimpsed beneath the waves of sussurant hiss and rumble, and the lonesome wail of a foghorn and the screech of locomotive brakes echo softly through the sprawling nightscape. Clanking metallic sounds appear alongside brief fragments of dialogue from the film, which add to the febrile, hallucinatory feel of ths recording. Snippets of ancient Fats Waller records are shattered against planes of black static, and infected with swarms of buzzing glitchery and feedback. Weird chirping sounds, rattling metal and the unsettling cry of a mutant infant are all looped into whorls of warped rhythmic delirium.
The second side offers a similar mix of dialogue, dark rumbling noise and sinister drones, but there's also the centerpiece of Lynch's score, the utterly haunting torch song "In Heaven (Lady In The Radiator Song)" that suddenly appears amid the murky midnight rumblings. It's a short piece, only appearing for a moment, but it's one of the most memorable pieces of music to appear in a Lynch film, familair to anyone who has spent time in the world of Eraserhead. From that point on, the score gets considerably more abrasive and siniser, whirling wind rushing over bizarre gasping noises and random scraping sounds, bits of random percussive thump and distant wails lost in the fog, organ-like drones wheezing over swells of murky orchestral drone, everythuing growing ever more disorienting and disturbing, a monstrous blast of abstract and desolate industrial ambience.
This older Absurda release of Eraserhead features a ten minute bonus track titled "Eraserhead (Dance Mix)", produced by Lynch and his Bluebob cohort John Neff; fusing the abstract ambience and a cut-up collage of elements of the score, the duo drape this dreamlike wash of sound across a relentless machinelike thump, a hypnotic industrial workout that could easily sit in between some old Wax Trax 12" and something from Alberich in some saavy DJ's playlist. Even on it's own, this music is utterly surreal, and sufficiently nightmare inducing, The soundtrack proper is a minor masterpiece of industrialized ambience.

Track Samples:
Sample : In Heaven (Lady In the Radiator Song)
Sample : ÿþDigah's Stomp/Lenox Avenue Blues/Stompin’ the Bug/Messin’ Around With t
Sample : Eraserhead [Dance Mix]



MHONOS   Humiliati   CASSETTE   (Zanjeer Zani Production)    8.00



    Now available as a super-limited cassette (limited to one hundred hand-numbered copies) from French necro-sludge imprint Zanjeer Zani Productions...
    Album number two from this mysterious, black-cloaked collective from France, an ensemble of hooded drone-sculptors who craft monstrous low-frequency psych-dirges through a ritualistic process that has more in common with classic industrial music than the French black metal scene that the band initially emerged from. Each member bears the monastic title of "Frater", each attributed to "low-frequency bass", with other members credited to synthesizers, prayer bowls, bells, "infrasounds", "organum", "ultrasounds" and "incantations"; the entire aesthetic behind Mhonos's music gives it the feel of some arcane underground cult. The music of Humiliati follows in a similar vein as their cassette releases, a kind of experimental extreme doom metal that dispenses with electric guitar, instead heavily relying on the layering of monstrous drones formed from rumbling bass guitar, hypnotic chanting vocals and warbling atonal keyboards to crate their blackened ritualistic dronescapes, the sound infested with crackling electronics and a throbbing, almost motorik pulse that seethes beneath the liturgical black rumble.
    Opening with the thunderous rhythmic pounding of booming kettledrum-like percussion, the band immediately establishes their delirious, ritualistic atmosphere with "Aleveus Terra", as pounding death-rite drums echo through the air, laying down a heavy trance-inducing rhythm that completely dominates the first several minutes of the half-hour long track. After awhile, the band slowly emerges into the mix with distant churning choral moans surfacing around those booming drums, gradually joined by swaying, hypnotic bass riffs and billowing clouds of low-end murkiness. Gregorian-like chanting starts to appear, bringing with them a blackened ecstasy, the sound of eyeless monks lost in endless prayer at the center of a circle of monstrous rhythmic pounding and gnarled, sinister riffage. Later on, loud bursts of distorted doom-laden heaviness briefly appear, and as additional layers of bass guitar are introduced, it starts to turn into a weird sort of blackened trance-rock, a little bit of an Aluk Todolo vibe showing through all of the rumbling black bass. And there is never any feeling of release, only an eternal tension that stretches all the way to the end of the sprawling track, the sound only becoming more complex and layered as it goes on, the band layering more of those warbling murky keyboards churning in the depths. The latter half of the track eventually drops out completely, drifting way out into a long spacious passage of clanking rhythmic heaviness and deep cosmic whoosh, the synthesizers howling and swooping around the ominous, psychedelic space-doom dirge.
    That goes right into the middle track "Ex Nihilo... Ad Nihilum...", where the band picks up the tempo a little bit, pounding out a steady thunderous drumbeat while deep, buzzing voices swirl around in a fog of droning chant and electronic textures, the chanting almost like Tuvan-styler throat singing, maintaining that evil, ritualistic atmosphere as they pound their way through this funereal fog-drenched synthdirge. It's laced with more of those mysterious chiming melodies and the metallic whirr of Tibetan prayer bowls, and the chortling sound of hollowed-out antlers, like some creepy John Carpenter-style electronic synth score merged with the sounds of some pagan blood ritual.
    That leads right into the epic closer "Mortificare", a churning twenty-four minute hypno-sludge workout that weaves crushing angular riffage into huge circular grooves, while a frantic howling voice raves in the distance, the sound building into an ecstasy of down-tuned blackened heaviness and looping rhythms, almost like a heavier, black metal tinged version of old-school hypno-rockers Gore, intense and discordant and seriously hypnotic. The band later drops off into long stretches of their creepy electronic drift and ritual drumming, the kosmische synths swirling in over the increasingly hysteric screams and moans of the singer, the music again becoming a strange soundtracky sort of psychedelia, swirling trance-inducing percussion percolating beneath sprawling fields of electronic whirr and drift, until it finally erupts into even heavier droning doom metal crush at the end, a torturous droning wall of tectonic pummel that rivals the likes of Moss or Monarch...
Track Samples:
Sample : Alveus Terra
Sample : Mortificare



MY DYING BRIDE   Turn Loose The Swans   2 x LP   (Peaceville)    30.00



    Newly reissued on vinyl, featuring the original track listing with no bonus material, pressed on 180 gram vinyl and presented in gatefold packaging - an absolute classic in the doom/death genre.
    Never had this album in stock at C-Blast before now, but with Peaceville's recent deluxe reissue of My Dying Bride's 1993 experimental doomdeath classic Turn Loose The Swans, we've got a perfect reason to ruminate on the genre-defining album. The British band was one of the pioneers of the "doomdeath" sound alongside Paradise Lost and Anathema, evolving from their earlier cavernous death metal sound into something much more atmospheric and elegant, slowing their heaviness down to immense, soul-crushing tempos. My Dying Bride took a more experimental approach to their sound compared to the other early doomdeath bands, and the unique goth-flecked sound that these guys crafted on their second album Turn Loose The Swans was unlike anything else in extreme metal back then.
    The use of keyboards and violin in death metal was still a pretty novel concept in 1993, as was the band's tendency towards epic-length arrangements that could stretched out for twelve minutes at a time. Opening with the brooding sounds of piano and violin, the first song "Sear Me MCMXCIII" drips with melancholic atmosphere, the vibe as despondent and introverted as anything in gothic rock, with front man Aaron Stainthorpe's deep, hushed vocals slowly creeping across the band's dismal orchestrations, as synth-like horn sounds pulse beneath the circling keys. And then when "Your River" follows with it's grueling, lumbering death metal, the contrast is intense and striking, even as those violin sounds continue to drift over the ugly, crushing riffage. The atmospheric metallic crush surges into strange breaks led by the bass guitar, then sinks into utterly mournful dirge, an almost folky funereal lament forming at the heart of the song. The vocals shift dramatically between Stainthorpe's guttural death metal growl and his distinctive droning, despondent croon, and there's a grief-stricken heaviness to this music that makes it completely unique. Listening to this classic My Dying Bride stuff now just proves how inept so many "gothic" influenced metal bands are in trying to capture this depth of emotional despair.
    The rest of Swans is equally intense, songs like "The Songless Bird" and "The Snow In My Hand" lurching with a glacial heaviness and twisted angularity, slipping into those weirdly baroque passages of synthesizer and strings. Blasts of crushing double bass and dark chromatic riffing are twisted into winding, majestic hooks, billowing into clouds of black saurian power from the subterranean depths, then transforming into miserably catchy epics like "The Crown of Sympathy", the heaviness stretching out into expansive synthesizer-heavy ambience and weird trumpet-flecked dirge. The title track is an all-time doomdeath classic, crushing morbid heaviness slowed down to a lumbering crawl, the vocals a restrained ghoulish rasp, the monstrous chugging riffage and jagged drum fills breaking off into a mist of funereal violin as the song weaves it's dismal ambience. And the last song, "Black God" closes the album with a somber, requiem-like arrangement for violin, droning synth and backing female vocals, over which Stainthorpe recites his lyrics in a half-whispered eulogy.
    A genuinely genre-defining album, Turn Loose The Swans is practically ground zero for the sort of massive, miserable metal that a million deathdoom bands have tried to emulate over the past two and a half decades. It's atmosphere of weird romanticism, morbid candlelit poetry, and barbaric slow-motion violence still sounds like noone else, and their style would prove to be a considerable influence on more recent progressive minded bands like Agalloch, Pantheist, Kauan, and Opeth. A pioneering extreme metal classic.
Track Samples:
Sample : Your River
Sample : Turn Loose the Swans
Sample : The Snow in My Hand
Sample : Black God



NECROPARTHENOPHAGY ⁄ LAYR   split   3" CDR   (Eleventh Key)    4.98



Back in stock!
This split 3" cd pairs up the blackened doom/noise mutations Layr and Necroparthenophagy, both of 'em proponents of seriously weird and noisy evil...
New York one man band Necroparthenophagy is first up with a nearly nine minute track of random metallic clatter, distant cavernous sound events, buzzing electrical cables, strange bestial breathing, random guitar noise and dissonant fragments of ominous melody. It's all very random and chaotic at first, but after a while coalescing into a strange rhythmic crawl as anguished cries and howling vocals begin to appear, a murky slow motion grind taking root underneath layers of cavernous drift, sounding like a slime encrusted mix of Wolf Eyes and Abruptum. A formless breed of blackened dirge noise, all creepy and wasted and shambling, with bizarre vocals that sound like some crazed bluesman shrieking at the bottom of a sewer drain. Fans of stuff like Abruptum, Ahulabrum, Gormantatinus, and the ultra-damaged black delirium that Korperschwache coughs up will love this.
And next up is Layr. Holy crap. Like Necroparthenophagy, this was a new discovery for us, and we sure as hell weren't expecting the vicious industrial doom that this band would deliver. "Looming" is a pitch-black wave of apocalyptic sludge, a washed out doom metal riff surging over the percussive hammering of machinery and factory noise, distant booming rhythms (tympani, maybe?) echoing in the background, hissing demonic vokills drifting overhead, the drums are murky and very metallic sounding, as if they are pounding out the sparse, brutal rhythms on empty oil drums and sheet metal. It's very industrial sounding, and very ugly, this pounding pitch-black crawl set against a background of tolling bells, random banging and pneumatic hiss, electronic fx and vintage synthesizer tones. Fucking awesome. Very reminiscent of Abruptum, but waaaaaaaay slower and more wretched.
The disc comes in a black and white sleeve, limited to fifty copies.
Track Samples:
Sample : LAYR - Looming
Sample : NECROPARTHENOPHAGY - Donasdogamatatastos



NUKLEAR BLAST SUNTAN   Prophetic Visions   LP   (SPHC)    11.99



They've toned down some of the over-the-top psychedelic mayhem of their last album, but Nuklear Blast Suntan still pack a seriously mutated whollop with their chaoticaly noisy punk. This is the Killer new LP of fucked-up hardcore weirdness from this band, now transplanted to Portland, OR from Georgia. It had been awhile since these guys have put out something new, but their latest is a real ripper, a scathing blast of psychedelic thrashpunk and darkly captivating hardcore that delivers all of the crazed kicks of their previous album on SPHC while tightening up and focusing their sound, though not by too much. It's still an intensely unhinged racket that they drum up; Like the strange portal that stares out into a endless black void on the cover of Prophetic Visions, the newest album from lysergic crust maniacs Nuklear Blast Suntan. Their weird, psychedelic version of hardcore ounk hasn't gotten any less trippy or ferocious, still a little reminiscent of Southern crust-punks Antischism but far more unhinged and proggy, the eleven songs barreling through their unqiue style of thrashy punk that has the bass guitrar holding down dark, post-punk tinged bass lines while the guitar continually supernovas into an endless squall of screeching feedback-drenched noise and effect-laden spaciness, or spirals out into squiggly chaos, wailign hard rock solos or blasts of caustic wah-pedal abuse; s always, there's a heavy dose of Hawkwindian space rock smeared all over their rampaging three-chord punk assault, though they keep almost the entire record racing at breakneck tempos, save for the occasional shift into a propulsively motorik style beat that they will sometimes downshift into singer Anna spews her ambiguous lyrics in an unintelligble muppet snarl that strips paint and sounds genuinely deranged. these songs are deceptively complex, with layered guitar parts and lots of odd counterpoint melodies piled on the otherwise straightforward speedbeat - fans of the other noise-punk bands that SPHC puts out will probably adore this, though Nuklear Blast Suntan offer something fairly different and much proggier than the Confuse-influenced distorto mayhem they sometimes get lumped in with.


PIG HEART TRANSPLANT   For Mass Consumption   CD   (20 Buck Spin)    10.98



    Now available as a limited-edition cassette from Iron Lung that has one exclusive track, and back in stock on digipack CD from 20 Buck Spin.
    When he's not flaying listeners alive with surgically precise powerviolence as one half of blastcore duo Iron Lung, Jon Kortland spends his time assembling gruesome power electronics assaults, pummeling slo-mo industrial sludge and desaturated ambient fragments with his solo outfit Pig Heart Transplant, who returns here with new album For Mass Consumption. This newest chunk of torturous, terrifying industrial punishment barrels over the listener with some of the most grueling industrial sludge I've heard from this project yet, though there's some stuff in here that borders on the cinematic when Kortland breaks out one of his super-short synthesizer pieces. And it's all super short, actually; the whole album is maddeningly made up of forty-five second tracks, twenty-eight of 'em, so the whole thing is constantly churning through one sonic attack after another, almost demanding an immediate replay to absorb all of this stuff. The core of Pig Heart Transplant's sound has long been rooted in a pummeling, noise-damaged heaviness influenced by the abject sludge of Cop / Filth-era Swans, but Kortland distorts and deforms his repetitious dirges into an immensely abrasive blast of sound that ends up mutating into something gnarlier. Each of these tracks lurches between that grinding distorted dirge and more experimental pieces that range from monotonous electronic drones to extreme over-modulated ear-hate and bouts of pummeling pistoning sheet-metal abuse, the monstrous vocals bellowing through the cracked and crumbling noisescapes. The distortion levels are pushed into ridiculous extremes, emitting waves of pulsating static reminiscent of certain strains of death industrial, as the sound threatens to disintegrate beneath the sheer corrosiveness of that distortion, blasts of caustic throb emanating from the boiling guts of some of these tracks like a particularly malignant Brighter Death Now recording. But Kortland also employs the occasional blast of excoriating No Wave guitar noise or eerie, blown-out synthesizer melody that will suddenly focus the crawling chrome-skinned horror into something more tangibly human. Even then, the obsessively brief nature of these decollated tracks makes this a jarring listen. A rumbling, misanthropic mass of monstrous pneumatic violence, one of the more challenging releases from Pig Heart Transplant, with more of that Feeding style of minimal typography that reminds me a little of the Young God aesthetic.
Track Samples:
Sample : Safe
Sample : Drug
Sample : Dirt
Sample : Acts
Sample : 1980



PIG HEART TRANSPLANT   For Mass Consumption   CASSETTE   (Iron Lung Records)    7.98



    Now available as a limited-edition cassette from Iron Lung that has one exclusive track, and back in stock on digipack CD from 20 Buck Spin.
    When he's not flaying listeners alive with surgically precise powerviolence as one half of blastcore duo Iron Lung, Jon Kortland spends his time assembling gruesome power electronics assaults, pummeling slo-mo industrial sludge and desaturated ambient fragments with his solo outfit Pig Heart Transplant, who returns here with new album For Mass Consumption. This newest chunk of torturous, terrifying industrial punishment barrels over the listener with some of the most grueling industrial sludge I've heard from this project yet, though there's some stuff in here that borders on the cinematic when Kortland breaks out one of his super-short synthesizer pieces. And it's all super short, actually; the whole album is maddeningly made up of forty-five second tracks, twenty-eight of 'em, so the whole thing is constantly churning through one sonic attack after another, almost demanding an immediate replay to absorb all of this stuff. The core of Pig Heart Transplant's sound has long been rooted in a pummeling, noise-damaged heaviness influenced by the abject sludge of Cop / Filth-era Swans, but Kortland distorts and deforms his repetitious dirges into an immensely abrasive blast of sound that ends up mutating into something gnarlier. Each of these tracks lurches between that grinding distorted dirge and more experimental pieces that range from monotonous electronic drones to extreme over-modulated ear-hate and bouts of pummeling pistoning sheet-metal abuse, the monstrous vocals bellowing through the cracked and crumbling noisescapes. The distortion levels are pushed into ridiculous extremes, emitting waves of pulsating static reminiscent of certain strains of death industrial, as the sound threatens to disintegrate beneath the sheer corrosiveness of that distortion, blasts of caustic throb emanating from the boiling guts of some of these tracks like a particularly malignant Brighter Death Now recording. But Kortland also employs the occasional blast of excoriating No Wave guitar noise or eerie, blown-out synthesizer melody that will suddenly focus the crawling chrome-skinned horror into something more tangibly human. Even then, the obsessively brief nature of these decollated tracks makes this a jarring listen. A rumbling, misanthropic mass of monstrous pneumatic violence, one of the more challenging releases from Pig Heart Transplant, with more of that Feeding style of minimal typography that reminds me a little of the Young God aesthetic.
Track Samples:
Sample : Safe
Sample : Drug
Sample : Dirt
Sample : Acts
Sample : 1980



RECTAL HYGIENICS   Ultimate Purity   LP   (Permanent)    19.98



    Falling somewhere in the shitpit between early Swans, the ultra-distorted noise rock of Rusted Shut, and the abject depravity of Brainbombs, the second slab of crushing skuzz-punk filth from Rectal Hygienics is one hell of a record, the latest in a string of offensives from this Chicago outfit made up of members of death electronics outfit Zone Tripper and powerviolence group Sea Of Shit. As you'd guess from the name, this is no tea party, but the hideous moniker is nothing compared to the album's violent, sexually-charged subject matter and imagery, which has landed these guys in the middle of a minor online furor after their lyrics were called out in a recent Pitchfork op-ed concerning perceived misogyny in noise rock. While it's obvious that these guys have spent a goodly amount of time melting their brains over repeated listens of Obey and Urge To Kill, this isn't the mindless Brainbombs worship and celebrated violence that some have painted it as. To me, their lyrics read like an uglier riff on the sort of blunt ruminations on power relationships that Swans first explored through early albums like Cop and Filth way back when. Regardless, it's an ugly, misanthropic din that Rectal Hygienics barf up across this LP, and if you've got the stomach for it, this delivers one of the heaviest noise rock assaults so far this year.
    Musically, it's a particularly sinister strain of American noise rock, informed by the sludgier end of the Am Rep spectrum. Lots of crushing repeato-riffage laid down over the drummer's pounding caveman rhythms, and slathered in sickly droning guitar leads and plenty of putrid feedback squelch. There's also some filthy hardcore punk that rears its head on songs like "Suffocating", and the riffs are punishing; the whole sound of this LP is super-distorted to the point where it sounds as if chunks of amplifier speaker are charring and crumbling in the midst of their songs, guitars like titanic basalt blocks being ground together, but there's some brutally infectious tunes under that grueling blown-out noise. There's a bit of that Brainbombs-style bludgeon in the grinding monotony that overtakes some of these tunes, and there's an untitled song at the end that has a bone-scraping saxophone assault that'll really shred your nerves, but the vocals are a weird mix of drawled singing and harsh, distorted screams, sometimes layered underneath that menacing, disaffected moan. Pretty fearsome stuff that claws down into some seriously sickening psych-sexual muck in the human spirit - certainly makes sense that these guys have been tour-mates with Total Abuse. Limited to five hundred copies, includes a foldout poster insert with lyrics.
Track Samples:
Sample : When I'm Alone
Sample : Ultimate Purity
Sample : Addicted To Filth



RITA, THE   Womankind 2: Cleopatra, Sacred Servants   CASSETTE   (Survivalist)    6.50



    Just like the other Survivalist tapes that are included in this new arrivals list, we've got extremely limited numbers of these tapes left, picked up from the label when the guys in Column Of Heaven came through the DC area earlier in 2014. Didn't get around to listing this two-track tape from Canadian harsh noise artist The Rita until now, but since it's already been out of print for awhile, move fast if you want to pick this up.
    Released by Survivalist in an edition of one hundred copies, Womankind 2 is another fetishistic blast of extreme rumbling distortion from The Rita that transforms into another one of Sam Mckinlay's signature meditation devices. Here The Rita explores it's obsession with Vivien Leigh through a pair of monolithic harsh noise walls, droning blasts of crushing electronic static that totally enfold the listener, and which has some distinctly physical properties if you listen to this under the right set of circumstances. As with most HNW releases of this nature, it's monotonous and largely unchanging, hypnotically abrasive as Mckinlay constructs an intense roaring wall of noise that offers very little in the way of dynamics, existing more as a kind of jet-black scrying tool. Samples of sorrowful piano and dialogue from the 1945 film Caesar and Cleopatra preface the onslaught of churning speakershred, but once the noise kicks in, it's a relentless roiling mass of static that threatens to overwhelm your speakers as it spreads out into an edgeless ocean of fire, laced with only the most subliminal traces of sonic detritus, sounds that could be the garbled howl of mysterious intercepted voices occasionally leaking through the bubbling carcinogenic trance-blast of MicKinlay's noisescape. Pure HNW.


SERPENTS   Demo 2004   CASSETTE   (Survivalist)    6.50



   Like all of the other Survivalist tapes that are featured on the current new arrivals list, we've got extremely limited qualities of the tape, which is already gone from the label. Released in a limited run of just one hundred copies, this cassette came out a while back on Survivalist (the Toronto-based cassette label operated by Andrew Nolan of Column Of Heaven / Death Agonies / Endless Blockade / Slaughter Strike), and it's the only recording that ever came out from this short-lived Irish outfit. The members would eventually go on to form the slightly more well-known band Drainland, who produce an equally pulverizing brand of dirge-core that's surfaced on labels like Southern Lord, and anyone into seriously ugly and nihilistic heaviness will be interested in the painfully slow and abrasive sludge rock that Serpents dredged up while they were around, a sound that draws heavily from the seminal dirge-abuse of early 80's-era Swans.
    The four tracks on their demo ooze with monstrous misanthropic ugliness, and it's just as discordant as it is bludgeoning. The first song "Hearse On Fire" lurches across the beginning of the tape as a sickening miasma of atonal guitar noise and clanking riffage, the singer shifting between a frantic howl and demented crooning singing, while the rhythm section flails beneath the ear-fucking noise that the guitarists are whipping up, putting their own mangled, sludge-encrusted stamp on the sort of skull-crushing dirge that Swans pioneered with Cop and Filth. The other songs often erupt into faster, more aggressive speeds that stink of ugly, old-school noise rock, and fans of the harshest extremes of the Am Rep/pigfuck oeuvre are going to get pretty aroused by Serpents' slugfuck heaviness. But it's definitely when these guys are pounding your skull with the sort of feedback-drenched riffchug and the undercurrents of haunting melody and cacophonic sludge that seethe out of songs like "Pigsty" and "A Million Knives" that Serpents were at their most fearsome, evoking the most crushing aspects of the classic HeadDirt / Permis De Construire Deutschland outfits (early Godflesh, Pore, Sweet Tooth, Head Of David, etc.), but with the down-tuned crush-factor amplified to an even more metallic degree. A very cool and very torturous chunk of obscure early oughties ear-hate.
Track Samples:
Sample : Hearse On Fire
Sample : Pigsty
Sample : Flower Of Flesh And Blood



SEWER GODDESS   Painlust   CD   (Malignant)    11.98



    Didn't really realize it until I sat down to note my impressions of the new Sewer Goddess album Painlust, but it's actually been a full five years since the Boston-area project gave us their last album, 2010's With Dirt You Are One . There's been a couple of smaller releases, EPs and tapes and the like that have surfaced in the interim, along with that killer Live Waste disc that Malignant put out a while back, but this new disc is the first full album of new material from the band in all this time. I loved the debut, and made it a featured new release here at C-Blast back when it came out; the way it fused its blackened power electronics to doom-metal guitars and squealing, skin-eating electronic noise managed to avoid sounding like just another Abruptum / Gnaw Their Tongues clone, and it was easily the heaviest thing that I'd ever heard come from the Malignant label up to that point. For the band's latest, though, mastermind Kristen Rose has re-shaped her band's sound into a more concentrated form: those grueling death industrial elements are still front and center, but Sewer Goddess's sophomore album strips away all of the extraneous flesh from their sound, mounting it on a ravenous industrial metal chassis that serves as a perfect delivery system for Rose's noxious, masochistic visions.
    And where earlier efforts were primarily the work of Rose alone, Sewer Goddess has also now evolved into an actual band, which includes Carl Haas from power electronics project Sharpwaist on bass; there's also a guest appearance from guitarist John Gelso of black metal legends Profanatica and The Royal Arch Blaspheme on the song "Get The Rope". With this expanded lineup, Painlust naturally offers a heavier, fuller sound than before, and that's never more apparent than the tracks in which they lurch into their crushing, pestilent version of industrial metal. The album slow cranks its flesh-chewing gears, spreading apart the sound to get at the black rot inside of each track; when it starts off with the droning industrial clamor of "Plague Axis", it's a drawn-out introduction to Painlust's horrors, initiating contact through a long sprawl of dirgelike synthesizer chords, clanking metallic percussion and distorted screams that all seem to be taking place somewhere in the distance. But when the next song "My Grave" kicks in, it's a punch to the ribs, the band suddenly shifting into a supremely sinister-sounding industrial metal dirge with Rose now adopting an almost gothy disaffected moan, the music turning into a a strange shambling mix of putrescent electronics and slow-motion heaviness, with glimmers of something sad and beautiful beneath the grinding, squelchy sludge; it's like some blacker, more metallic take on early Swans, filtered through a heavy haze of black metal-esque atmopsherics and draped in gloomier guitars. Fucking fantastic.
    It isn't complex music, usually centering around a single dramatic riff that churns relentless through the band's blackened din. But it's nevertheless powerful stuff, hypnotic in its grinding monotony, but also surprisingly catchy. The tracks proceed through an array of deformed soundscapes and torturous industrial heaviness, oozing through warped blackened ambience and punishing Streetcleaner-esque hypno-sludge, vocals drifting across the album in a reptilian hiss or mutating into unsettling, heavily processed demonic moans. Painlust has plenty of moments where it's as heavy as any doom metal, but the surrounding layers of vile distorted electronics and filthy synthesizer keep it rooted in a more industrial sound. The best stuff on here are tracks like "Black Meat And Bones" and closer "Melena's Mask", both evoking the squealing discordance and grinding post-punk guitars of early Godflesh and Head Of David, with some earworm riffage fused to that assault of thunderous oil-drum percussion, clanging noise loops and Rose's creepy vocals, carving out a killer blast of howling, blackened machine-rock. More than ever before, this manages to evoke qualities of both Gnaw Their Tongues/MZ.412 style black industrial, and the apocalyptic pummel of Godflesh; in some ways, this stuff is also reminiscent of labelmates Sektor 304 with the blend of grinding electronic filth and bleak metallic heaviness, and certainly elicits a similarly blackened atmosphere. Totally fitting that the grotesque album art was designed by Sektor 304's Andre Coelho.
Track Samples:
Sample : My Grave
Sample : Get the Rope
Sample : Black Meat and Bones



SOLO ANDATA   Ritual   LP   (Desire Path Recordings)    17.99



    Can't tell you how this stacks up against the previous albums from Solo Andata as I've yet to hear them, but the Australian experimental duo's latest disc Ritual sure caught my attention with its eerie abstract sleeve art and some high praise that it had garnered over on the Anti-Gravity Bunny blog. AGB's description of Ritual as being "avant neo classical horror" was enough to send me searching it out, and certainly suggested that this Lp offered the sort of grim ambience that I continuously crave. And these four lengthy creepscapes do not disappoint, I'm pleased to report. By fusing richly detailed field recordings with delicate, dissonant drones and layers of almost subliminal whirr and creak, the duo creates a truly unnerving atmosphere right from the beginning of the record, the opener "Aggregate" slowly drifting out of the sounds of nocturnal insect life and the noxious buzzing of flies into an increasingly bleak dronescape that recalls the blackest corners of the SMTG Limited catalog. Pulsating drones and distant prayer bowl-like reverberations quickly congeal into an atmosphere of nervous tension and portentous dread, and each of the subsequent tracks likewise drift languidly through a blackened haze of metallic percussive noises and distant scraping sounds, surrounded with swells of ghostly murmur and keening feedback, the noxious buzzing of something small and insistent flitting in and out of the mix, as discordant piano notes appear ringing out of the depths amid the slow crackle of a dying fire.
    "Incantare" takes over the entire second side of the album, a twenty minute piece that takes Solo Andata's sound in a slightly more musical (but no less eerie) direction. Peals of ghostly feedback and amplifier buzz ascend over more of those nocturnal field recordings, the sounds of distant bells and the chug of some mechanical engine shifting in and out of focus as softly strummed chords and a simple, brooding bass line take hold, turning this into a kind of ethereal, twilight slowcore laced with unearthly cries and mysterious rattling that inhabits the background of the entire track. The dull throb of a soft electronic drone surfaces beneath those dreamlike bell sounds, looping endlessly in the distance, echoing from some mist-shrouded chuch steeple on the edge of the Borderland, washes of murky metallic drift creeping across the midnight soundscape, leading into bits of buried technoid thump, gradual shifts into a morbid electronica that signals the latter half of the track. Truly an unsettling excursion into eventide electronics and mysterious soundcraft, spare and minimal in the vein of some of my favorite avant-garde horror scores.


SUMAC   The Deal   CD   (Profound Lore)    13.98



    Debut album The Deal delivers much of what you'd expect from a new band from Aaron Turner of Isis / Old Man Gloom / Hydra Head fame, often locking into the sort of crushing clockwork riffery and sludgy majesty that his other outfits have been known for. Sumac delves a little deeper into the math rock side of his music though, an influence that has found its way into all of his bands but which really comes to the fore here, with lots of spiraling, snarled guitar and Slint-y melody featured prominently among the band's powerful, lockstep grooves that cut huge furrows through the darkened dissonant atmosphere. The band features Turner teamed up with drummer Nick Yacyshyn from the hardcore outfit Baptists, with additional aid from bassist Brian Cook (Botch / Russian Circles) to flesh these songs out, and their six-song debut is highly enjoyable if you're a fan of ultra-heavy, angular math-sludge and abstract soundscapery.
    The chugging, crushing heaviness is also coupled with some interesting textures and moody instrumentation, some songs featuring guest piano courtesy of Turner's spouse and Mammiffer co-member Faith Coloccia, which gets chopped up and arranged into clipped drones stretching across washes of rumbling amplifier noise; other tracks employ heavy bouts of freeform feedback that swings the band's multi-jointed metal into blasts of almost improvised noise-rock. It's a slow-burn ambience that sweeps over opener "Spectral Gold", laying out a field of rumbling guitar drone and hushed percussion that builds a foreboding atmosphere across the beginning of the album, but once that slips into the fractured piano sounds and chordal clusters that introduce "Thorn In The Lion's Paw", this heads out into pretty heavy territory. That titanic heaviness frequently flows into more experimental atmospheric passages, cranking the staccato riffs, earth-shaking double bass drumming and pummeling, complex rhythms to the point of bone-cracking tension, then dispersing it into long, drawn-out stretches of eerie drift laced in sun-baked Morricone-esque twang, doleful melody or clusters of discordant disembodied chords. When the guys in Sumac really drop their hammer, though, it's ridiculously heavy stuff, with the title track even dropping into a punishing discordant churn that actually has a tinge of Gorgutsian death metal to it. Nick Yacyshyn's drumming is also noteworthy, meeting Turner's jagged-edged riffage and ominous atmospheric heaviness head-on with his mixture of pounding metallic power and frenzied fill-heavy chaos that almost sounds as if there's a free-jazz influence creeping in to certain points on the album. With songs that slowly unlock across great lengths, The Deal is more of a grower than some of Turner's other projects, but anyone into his stuff and the heaviest of mathy metallic crunch will definitely want to hear this. Comes in gatefold packaging.
Track Samples:
Sample : Thorn In The Lion's Paw
Sample : The Radiance Of Being
Sample : Blight's End Angel



SWANS   Filth / Body To Body, Job To Job   2 x CD   (Young God)    18.98



    An essential early Swans collection, finally back in stock in tandem with the killer new LP reissue of the band's peerless debut Filth, a masterpiece of abject dread and late 20th century urban horror.
    Hey, it's 2015, and still nothing matches the sheer teeth-loosening power of Swans' Filth. An all-time favorite, this one, a crucial slab of crushing urban decay and psychological putrescence from this legendary, pioneering post-punk outfit. The band's 1983 debut (originally released on Neutral Records) from the classic pre-Jarboe lineup is Swans at their all-time ugliest, lumbering through a set of some of the nastiest No Wave-damaged sludge ever, their sound and their attack informed by the early industrial skree of Throbbing Gristle, the discordant energy surrounding the nascent NYC art-punk underground, and the caveman punk stomp of classic Stooges. At the time, Gira stated that he wanted Swans to be heavier than anything else, and he succeeded - make no mistake, Filth sounded like nothing else in the early 80s, an abject trudge through pounding brutalist rhythms produced by the formidable drumming team of Jonathan Kane and Roli Mosimann, who bashed out their simple but powerful rhythms on dual drum kits and assorted metal detritus, infesting the booming slow dirge-like tempos with an array of clanking junk, while guitarist Norman Westberg smears his atonal chords and howling jagged anti-melodies over the spiked off-kilter grooves, and Harry Crosby's bass lurches against the beat. Behind the band's abrasive assault, various crudely constructed tape loops and mutated electronics squeal and splutter, a backdrop of warped noises that potentiate the disturbing feel of this music. The atonal skronk of songs like "Big Strong Boss" obviously draw from the No Wave stuff that had emerged several years earlier, but here Gira and team hammered that sound into something so much more heavy and grotesque, a perfect backing on which Gira was able to hang his yowling vocals, his lyrics drenched in themes of power, sex, greed and debasement that Gira would continue to explore throughout Swans' career, but here blunted and stripped down to a kind of broken sewer poetry, barked out in a minimal, declamatory delivery over the band's brutal noise-addled punk. Seminal stuff; just take a listen to the discordant quasi-hardcore of "Freak", there's no mistaking the album's influence on pretty much all extreme metal, punk and industrial that followed. A truly essential album within the realm of extreme music.
    The Filth disc is rounded out with a pummeling twenty-four minute live set comprised of recordings made between 1982 and 1983 at legendary NYC experimental art venue The Kitchen, featuring six tracks taken from various early Swans releases ("Strip/Burn", "Heatsheet", "Blackout", "Clay Man", "Stay Here" and "Weakling"); this live material captures the band at full ferocity, battering their way through sprawling, monotonous percussive assaults, the band hammering the audience with their din of howling noise and clanking scrap-metal rhythms and lurching, elliptic heaviness. Fucking awesome.
    The second disc is an expanded version of Swans' 1991 compilation Body To Body, Job To Job, a collection of material recorded between 1982 and 1985 comprised of assorted studio recordings (mostly alternate versions of material from the band's Cop album) and some of the squealing noise loops that the band created to be played during their live sets. It's all odds'n'ends, but really fascinating for fans of this era of the band, back when Swans were creating some of the heaviest music to come out of the American post-punk underground. At their heaviest, you get the tortured dirge of "I'll Cry For You" and the howling pummel of "Red Sheet", churning rhythmic thud driven by the crushing dual-drummer assault, while the lurching discordant sludge of "Your Game" and "Half Life" clearly shows where Justin Broadrick got his inspiration for Godflesh's industrial grindcore. That and the other studio recordings featured here rank as some of the bands heaviest ever, monstrous slabs of deformed industrial funk and squalling No Wave horror, insidiously hypnotic but lashed with astringent guitars, offset by murky live tracks that ooze out of your speakers like so much black blood and engine grease. An act of endless self-immolation in motion, the disc finally collapses beneath the weight of a monstrous live rendition of the band's classic "Raping A Slave", recorded in Berlin in 1984, a final testament to the ruination of wretched flesh. Essential.
Track Samples:
Sample : Cop
Sample : Freak
Sample : Get Out
Sample : Job
Sample : Power for Power
Sample : Stay Here
Sample : Weakling



SWANS   Filth   LP   (Young God)    17.98



    Hey, it's 2015, and still nothing matches the sheer teeth-loosening power of Swans' Filth. An all-time favorite, this one. Out of print on vinyl for decades, Young God's new reissue of Filth was one of the most highly anticipated reissues here at C-Blast, a crucial slab of crushing urban decay and psychological putrescence from this legendary, pioneering post-punk outfit. Newly re-mastered and presented in essentially the same jacket design as the original with a large foldout poster, the band's 1983 debut (originally released on Neutral Records) has certainly never sounded heavier or more bludgeoning than it does here. Long available only via the band's extensive double CD collection Filth / Body To Body Job To Job, this album from the classic pre-Jarboe lineup is Swans at their all-time ugliest, lumbering through a set of some of the nastiest No Wave-damaged sludge ever, their sound and their attack informed by the early industrial skree of Throbbing Gristle, the discordant energy surrounding the nascent NYC art-punk underground, and the caveman punk stomp of classic Stooges. At the time, Gira stated that he wanted Swans to be heavier than anything else, and he succeeded - make no mistake, Filth sounded like nothing else in the early 80s, an abject trudge through pounding brutalist rhythms produced by the formidable drumming team of Jonathan Kane and Roli Mosimann, who bashed out their simple but powerful rhythms on dual drum kits and assorted metal detritus, infesting the booming slow dirge-like tempos with an array of clanking junk, while guitarist Norman Westberg smears his atonal chords and howling jagged anti-melodies over the spiked off-kilter grooves, and Harry Crosby's bass lurches against the beat. Behind the band's abrasive assault, various crudely constructed tape loops and mutated electronics squeal and splutter, a backdrop of warped noises that potentiate the disturbing feel of this music. The atonal skronk of songs like "Big Strong Boss" obviously draw from the No Wave stuff that had emerged several years earlier, but here Gira and team hammered that sound into something so much more heavy and grotesque, a perfect backing on which Gira was able to hang his yowling vocals, his lyrics drenched in themes of power, sex, greed and debasement that Gira would continue to explore throughout Swans' career, but here blunted and stripped down to a kind of broken sewer poetry, barked out in a minimal, declamatory delivery over the band's brutal noise-addled punk. Seminal stuff; just take a listen to the discordant quasi-hardcore of "Freak", there's no mistaking the album's influence on pretty much all extreme metal, punk and industrial that followed. A truly essential album within the realm of extreme music.
Track Samples:
Sample : Freak
Sample : Power for Power
Sample : Stay Here
Sample : Weakling



UMBERTO   Temple Room   LP   (Not Not Fun)    18.98



Back in stock!
   This one is already out of print and we only nabbed a couple copies, so I'll try not to rave about this super-limited 12" from spook-synth revivalist Umberto for too long. Temple Room is one of the most recent releases from the increasingly popular Umberto, probably the only contemporary artist right now successfully driving a black spike through the intersection of John Carpenter's malevolent minimalism and the baroque, rotted aura of Fabio Frizzi. Out of all of the contemporary electronic artists currently revisiting the golden era of horror soundtracks and vintage synthesizer music, Umberto is one of my favorites, with a unique style that effortlessly synthesizes a number of influences; not just the aforementioned murky graveyard prog of Fabio Frizzi and pulsating minimalism of John Carpenter, but also the grandiose synthesizer arrangements of Claudio Simonetti and the malignant mesmerism of European disco, weaving these influences together into something that still sounds remarkably fresh, at least to my ears. While we're waiting on the follow-up to last year's excellent Confrontation, Umberto has slipped us this EP featuring two versions of the track "Temple Room" off the 2010 album Prophecy Of The Black Widow.
   The extended version of "Temple Room" that spreads across the a-side is a fourteen minute exploration into deep, dark Carpenterian synth-dread laced with gothic majesty. Eerie pipe organs drone beneath the vintage electronic melody and pulsating synths, ominous arpeggios looping over the shimmering black waves of chordal drift, slowly building in tension before the drums kick in and the whole thing suddenly erupts into an infectious evil disco groove, thumping midnight body music, a slick death-disco trance that stretches its hypnotic bass line across nearly the entire side - it's one of the most insidious dancefloor ready pieces of synthcreep I've heard from Umberto, catchy and creepy and utterly contagious.
    The b-side remix is a high-energy pounding Euro-disco delirium, washes of spacey synth and glimmering celestial electronic sweeping over the faster backbeat, distinct enough from the original to sound almost like an entirely different track, though there are some key elements from the original theme you can still make out beyond the swirl of astral drift and the more aggressive tempo, later slipping into an endless dark groove. Fucking fantastic, essential for anyone into the current synthwave fascination and retro-splatter synth scores coming from the likes of Robin Coudert, Zombi, Gatekeeper, Antoni Maiovvi, etc.


VARIOUS ARTISTS   Fathers Of Our Flesh: Tribute To Godflesh   CD   (Fobofile Productions)    12.98



    Available on both CD and double LP in gatefold packaging, the latter limited to three hundred copies.
    There's no denying the immense influence that pioneering British band Godflesh had on countless bands since the release of their self-titled debut in the late 80s. The band almost single-handedly created the "industrial metal" sound, and would help shape numerous other directions in underground metal, rock and electronic music in the decades to follow. Enlisting a bunch of bands to pay homage to Godflesh is a breeze (and has been done before), but while we've seen a couple of tribute anthologies to Godflesh in the past, the new Fathers of Our Flesh compilation is by far the best. It succeeds not only because of the strong lineup of bands that were assembled for this project (including the likes of Knut, Nadja, Gnaw, Omega Massif, Author & Punisher and Wormed), but also because each band offers an interesting re-interpretation of the music rather than just running through by-the-numbers renditions.
    The line-up is a who's-who of contemporary avant-garde metal and extreme experimental rock: long running Swiss math-metal/noise rock outfit Knut transform "Merciless" into their own jagged, droning image, the melancholic vibe of the original meshing nicely with Knut's crushing down-tuned lurch while definitely putting a different spin on the song, and one-man machine-orchestra Author & Punisher forges a pulsating dancefloor monstrosity out of "Body Dome Light" that at first resembles a super-heavy version of Wax Trax-era industrial, before dropping into a wicked blast of bone-rattling bass-bin destruction and ultra-distorted mechanized heaviness that leaves the song only barely recognizable. And the covers keep getting more imaginative. Italy's Ovo deliver one of the compilation's most harrowing tracks with their cover of "Like Rats"; they throttle it into a bizarre blend of wobbly dub-step rhythms, droning industrial metal and tribal percussion, singer Stefania spitting out the lyrics in a spiteful wheeze that gives this an even more demented vibe, especially towards the end when the band start to unleash an avalanche of rumbling noise and juddering percussive power. And ex-Iceburn power-sludge dup Eagle Twin likewise put "White Flag" through a ringer, extrapolating on the song's haunting melody as they stretch it out and pull it apart over a crushing saurian dirge, Gentry Densley's almost Tuvan croak soaring through a fog of delay and echo, turning this into a majestic wash of searing Brötzmann Massaker-esque feedback obliteration and skull-warping dub-sludge delirium.
    You get Drugs of Faith running "Paralyzed" through their ferocious grindcore discordance, followed by some band called Mandemiurgeshit whose contribution here is apparently their only release so far; it's a pounding rendition of "Predominance" that strips away the concrete-mixer riffage of the original for throbbing electro-industrial rhythms and doom-laden, heavily distorted synthesizers. Unsurprisingly, Gnaw's appearance makes for the most terrifying moment on Fathers, as they transform "Life Is Easy" into a nigh-unrecognizable rotting carcass of shrieking electronics and putrid screaming, that stirring melody from the original almost obliterated by the shambling, slow-motion horror that the group drag out across the floor. And in the hands of French sludge metallers Omega Massif, "Don't Bring Me Flowers" is reconstructed as a monumental slab of hypnotic, instrumental doom awash in layered guitar noise, while Spanish avant-deathgrinders Wormed counter with their savage intergalactic death metal vision of "Tiny Tears", one of the fastest tracks on the record as they send it hurtling through a vicious storm of off-kilter blastbeats, psychedelic shred and bowel-beast vocalizations.
    One of the covers I was most interested in hearing was Transitional's take on "Avalanche Master Song", seeing as how the band is fronted by frequent Broadrick collaborator Dave Cochrane (God, Head Of David, Ice, Greymachine); his crew sticks pretty close to the original, while casting some interesting dark textures across their version, bathing it in an additional wash of cinematic ambience and some trippy dub-informed effects. Very cool. Wasn't familiar with the two bands that followed, though both are impressive; Japanese breakcore/grind maniac Maruosa with his hyperspeed glitched out take on "Defeated", shooting it through a cyclotron and spitting it out into a zonked-out speedcore assault threaded with acid-damaged Hammond organs; and Warsawwarsaw turn "Pulp" into an abstract mass of misshapen metallic clank, acoustic strings and sinister post-punk that becomes quite gripping, and probably the furthest afield anyone goes on this comp in re-interpreting Godflesh's music.
    Which leads to the sprawling epic closer, a fifteen minute rendition of "Go Spread Your Wings" from dreamsludge duo Nadja. Their presence here makes perfect sense, as Godflesh's music has been a major influence on Nadja's sound from the start, but here Nadja diffuse Godflesh's heaviness into something different from the Jesu-like shoegazer crush you might expect, instead stretching this out into a fuzz-drenched dirge that smolders and crumbles across it's length, Aidan Baker's murmured vocals almost lost beneath the static-crackle of the guitars, the minimal pulse of the drum machine buried beneath waves of blissful, bleary drone and somnambulant, saturated dirge. A perfect closer to this collection.
Track Samples:
Sample : WORMED - Tiny Tears
Sample : OVO - Like Rats
Sample : GNAW - Life is easy
Sample : AUTHOR & PUNISHER - Body Dome Light



VARIOUS ARTISTS   Fathers Of Our Flesh: Tribute To Godflesh   2 x LP   (Fobofile Productions)    25.00



    Available on both CD and double LP in gatefold packaging, the latter limited to three hundred copies.
    There's no denying the immense influence that pioneering British band Godflesh had on countless bands since the release of their self-titled debut in the late 80s. The band almost single-handedly created the "industrial metal" sound, and would help shape numerous other directions in underground metal, rock and electronic music in the decades to follow. Enlisting a bunch of bands to pay homage to Godflesh is a breeze (and has been done before), but while we've seen a couple of tribute anthologies to Godflesh in the past, the new Fathers of Our Flesh compilation is by far the best. It succeeds not only because of the strong lineup of bands that were assembled for this project (including the likes of Knut, Nadja, Gnaw, Omega Massif, Author & Punisher and Wormed), but also because each band offers an interesting re-interpretation of the music rather than just running through by-the-numbers renditions.
    The line-up is a who's-who of contemporary avant-garde metal and extreme experimental rock: long running Swiss math-metal/noise rock outfit Knut transform "Merciless" into their own jagged, droning image, the melancholic vibe of the original meshing nicely with Knut's crushing down-tuned lurch while definitely putting a different spin on the song, and one-man machine-orchestra Author & Punisher forges a pulsating dancefloor monstrosity out of "Body Dome Light" that at first resembles a super-heavy version of Wax Trax-era industrial, before dropping into a wicked blast of bone-rattling bass-bin destruction and ultra-distorted mechanized heaviness that leaves the song only barely recognizable. And the covers keep getting more imaginative. Italy's Ovo deliver one of the compilation's most harrowing tracks with their cover of "Like Rats"; they throttle it into a bizarre blend of wobbly dub-step rhythms, droning industrial metal and tribal percussion, singer Stefania spitting out the lyrics in a spiteful wheeze that gives this an even more demented vibe, especially towards the end when the band start to unleash an avalanche of rumbling noise and juddering percussive power. And ex-Iceburn power-sludge dup Eagle Twin likewise put "White Flag" through a ringer, extrapolating on the song's haunting melody as they stretch it out and pull it apart over a crushing saurian dirge, Gentry Densley's almost Tuvan croak soaring through a fog of delay and echo, turning this into a majestic wash of searing Brötzmann Massaker-esque feedback obliteration and skull-warping dub-sludge delirium.
    You get Drugs of Faith running "Paralyzed" through their ferocious grindcore discordance, followed by some band called Mandemiurgeshit whose contribution here is apparently their only release so far; it's a pounding rendition of "Predominance" that strips away the concrete-mixer riffage of the original for throbbing electro-industrial rhythms and doom-laden, heavily distorted synthesizers. Unsurprisingly, Gnaw's appearance makes for the most terrifying moment on Fathers, as they transform "Life Is Easy" into a nigh-unrecognizable rotting carcass of shrieking electronics and putrid screaming, that stirring melody from the original almost obliterated by the shambling, slow-motion horror that the group drag out across the floor. And in the hands of French sludge metallers Omega Massif, "Don't Bring Me Flowers" is reconstructed as a monumental slab of hypnotic, instrumental doom awash in layered guitar noise, while Spanish avant-deathgrinders Wormed counter with their savage intergalactic death metal vision of "Tiny Tears", one of the fastest tracks on the record as they send it hurtling through a vicious storm of off-kilter blastbeats, psychedelic shred and bowel-beast vocalizations.
    One of the covers I was most interested in hearing was Transitional's take on "Avalanche Master Song", seeing as how the band is fronted by frequent Broadrick collaborator Dave Cochrane (God, Head Of David, Ice, Greymachine); his crew sticks pretty close to the original, while casting some interesting dark textures across their version, bathing it in an additional wash of cinematic ambience and some trippy dub-informed effects. Very cool. Wasn't familiar with the two bands that followed, though both are impressive; Japanese breakcore/grind maniac Maruosa with his hyperspeed glitched out take on "Defeated", shooting it through a cyclotron and spitting it out into a zonked-out speedcore assault threaded with acid-damaged Hammond organs; and Warsawwarsaw turn "Pulp" into an abstract mass of misshapen metallic clank, acoustic strings and sinister post-punk that becomes quite gripping, and probably the furthest afield anyone goes on this comp in re-interpreting Godflesh's music.
    Which leads to the sprawling epic closer, a fifteen minute rendition of "Go Spread Your Wings" from dreamsludge duo Nadja. Their presence here makes perfect sense, as Godflesh's music has been a major influence on Nadja's sound from the start, but here Nadja diffuse Godflesh's heaviness into something different from the Jesu-like shoegazer crush you might expect, instead stretching this out into a fuzz-drenched dirge that smolders and crumbles across it's length, Aidan Baker's murmured vocals almost lost beneath the static-crackle of the guitars, the minimal pulse of the drum machine buried beneath waves of blissful, bleary drone and somnambulant, saturated dirge. A perfect closer to this collection.
Track Samples:
Sample : WORMED - Tiny Tears
Sample : OVO - Like Rats
Sample : GNAW - Life is easy
Sample : AUTHOR & PUNISHER - Body Dome Light



WITCH MOUNTAIN   Mobile Of Angels   CD   (Profound Lore)    13.98



   One of 2014's finest doom metal albums is now back in stock, on both limited edition LP (issued in a run of five hundred copies in gatefold packaging) and gatefold CD with printed inner sleeve.
    Since the late 90s, the Portland, Oregon doom metal band Witch Mountain has been dishing out their solemn brand of traditional slow-motion heaviness, shaped by the sound of classic early American doom. It wasn't until the band resurfaced after a period of inactivity with a new singer and a revamped sound on 2011's South Of Salem that they really started to gain notice from the larger metal community. It was the addition of singer Uta Plotkin and her emotionally powerful voice that brought new life to the band, as the guys began to meld their stoned saurian blues-crush with her soulful female vocals to fantastic effect. That potent combination of massive riffage, stirring sorrowful melodies and Plotkin's singular singing style that has become the focal point of the band's sound over the past several years, so when the announcement came out late in 2014 that she would be departing the band following the release of Witch Mountain's fourth album Mobile Of Angels, fans of the band wondered what would become of their sound; as it turns out, she's since been replaced by Washington DC native Kayla Dixon, who brings a similarly confident and powerful vocal delivery to the band, so it'll be interesting to see where their music goes from here.
    But Plotkin did leave the band on a very high note, musically. When that lineup parted ways, it was in the wake of one of the best doom albums of 2014. Now issued on limited edition vinyl, Mobile Of Angels is one that should find its way into the collection of every fan of classically-minded, psychedelically tinged doom metal. Plotkin's soulful, sultry smoke-wreathed vocals sound more bewitching than ever here, soaring above the band's lurching Sabbathian heaviness and what adds up to be their best batch of songs of their career. Sounding not too far off from a young Ann Wilson but also capable of puking up a ghastly death-screech over a particularly gruesome dirge like that towards the end of "Don't Settle", Plotkin rides on the band's epic songcraft, elevating Mobile high above the hordes of traditional doom outfits. These five monstrous tunes crawl sluggishly across the album's forty minute runtime, skillfully weaving passages of solemn beauty amid the slow-motion sludge, adding lots of moody texture to their music by incorporating bits of acoustic strum, droning, stoned-out Hammond organ, vibraphone, piano and gongs, all woven into a wealth of plaintive, understated melodies that snake through the album's rain-drenched sylvan atmosphere, and seeping to the surface between the swell of pulverizing doom, each song encircling some killer hooks that balance out the sheer sluggish weight of this stuff. A fuckin' feast of titanic sinister riffage and 70's-tinged soulfulness from these guys, and it ends with one of the most gorgeously forlorn doom songs ("The Shape Truth Takes") the band has ever delivered. Highly recommended.
Track Samples:
Sample : Your Corrupt Ways (Sour the Hymn)
Sample : Psycho Animundi
Sample : Mobile of Angels



WOLVES OF HEAVEN / NYODENE D   split   CASSETTE   (Survivalist)    6.50



    A killer split between Column Of Heaven industrial/noise offshoot Wolves Of Heaven and experimental death industrialist Nyodene D, originally released as a super-limited cassette on Andrew Nolan's Survivalist imprint (of which we have a very few copies remaining in stock), here reissued on vinyl by Anthems Of The Undesirable.
    Combining elements of Broken Flag-style industrial with the more monstrous exhortations of latter-day Bastard Noise, Wolves Of Heaven offer up a seething, pitch-black industrial mutation on their side. Beginning with the bellowing death industrial dirge "Desire", deep guttural vocals echo across a bleak, tortured noisescape formed from blasts of distorted bass, pounding freeform tribal drumming, corroded electronics, fluttering oscillator-like frequencies, and misshapen rhythmic sounds that splutter beneath the increasingly aggressive onslaught. Ugly and heavy and ultimately pretty trance-inducing as the band eventually locks into a putrid mechanical throb that takes over the latter part of the track. The other track "Release" unfolds with bursts of low-end noise echoing over a desolate field of scraping metal detritus and minimal whirr, starting off rather restrained. When it suddenly explodes into a deafening blast of noxious, suffocating power electronics, it's almost startling, as delay-drenched screams hurtle through a wall of distorted bass-drone and static filth, a crushing synthlike riff gradually revealing itself beneath the scraping, searing cacophony. Later, a haunting, quasi-kosmische melody drifts out over the swells of corrosive low-end noise, leading to an unusually arresting and atmospheric climax. An interesting, powerful approach that builds upon the member's previous experiments with noise and electronics.
    The Nyodene D tracks on the second side offer a similarly striking combination of apocalyptic lyrical visions and absolutely punishing industrial music, here lumbering through three lengthy tracks much in the vein of his fantastic Edenfall album. Grinding machinelike rhythms rumble beneath the steady, deliberate pounding of drums, giving "Nostalgia Is A Weapon" an almost militaristic feel as crushing, doom-laden drones, terrifying choral ambience and those putrid, electronically processed vocals intermingle and undulate across Nyodene D's inferno. There are moments of brief calm that emerge at the tail end of some of the tracks, but for the most part this is relentless in its slow motion pummeling, those vaguely martial drums maintaining the deathmarch tempo as he continues to unleash bursts of electronic noise and acrid distortion, eerie monor key melodies and distant orchestral strings drifting through the depths, spacey synthlike effects and shrill metallic drones surrounding the slow collapse of scrap metal mountains crumbling to the earth, that martial pummel giving this an almost Swans-like feel. Terrifying.
Track Samples:
Sample : NYODENE D - Salt
Sample : NYODENE D - Nostalgia Is A Weapon









  




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